Latest News

Headquarters of Gilead Sciences in Foster City, Calif.  July 9, 2015.

Gilead Off Hook for Enhancement of $2.5B Patent Verdict

By Scott Graham |

U.S. District Judge Leonard Stark in Delaware ruled Friday that Gilead's conduct didn't warrant enhanced damages for willful infringement in a patent fight with Merck subsidiary Idenix.

Internet of things (IoT) concept. Businessman presses IoT solution represented by symbol connected with icons of typical IoT. Intelligent house, car, camera, watch, washing machine. Smart digital home

D-Link Ruling May Help Device Makers, but Isn't a Total Win

By Ben Hancock |

A federal judge rebuffed the idea that security flaws alone can meet the injury hurdle. But that's unlikely to close litigation over the issue altogether.

Trenton Ward, Finnegan, Atlanta.

Q&A: Returning to Big Law After 'Once in a Career' Patent Gig

By Scott Graham |

Trenton Ward became an administrative judge on the Patent Trial and Appeal Board just as it was emerging as a venue for patent validity challenges. Five years later, he's returning to private practice as a partner at Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner.

Julie Q. Brush, Solutus Legal Search .

Should You Include a Short Job Stint on Your Resume?

By Julie Brush |

Regardless of how bad it might look or how irrelevant it might seem, you’ve got to tell the truth about your professional background on your resume. Every morsel of it.

Colin Stretch, Facebook general counsel.

Facebook GC Explains 'Difficult Decision' to Turn Over Russian Ads in Congressional Probe

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

Colin Stretch gave his take on the decision in a post on his company's website.

U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington, DC

Federal Circuit: No More Loosey-Goosey Rules on Patent Venue

By Scott Graham |

The decision interpreting the Supreme Court's TC Heartland ruling will be cheered by tech companies and make it harder for patent suits to stick in the Eastern District of Texas.

On the Move: Tracking the Ins and Outs of California Lawyers

By Pearl Wu |

New hires, promotions, appointments and awards in-house, at firms and in government and academia.

Feds Ask for Sanctions in Foreign Data Fight With Google

By Cheryl Miller |

Federal prosecutors want Google Inc. sanctioned for refusing to hand over government-sought emails stored on its overseas servers, according to documents filed Wednesday.

First-Year Associate Jobs Set For Slight Rise, Survey Finds

By Chris Johnson |

The number of first-year associate jobs at law firms across the U.S. and Canada is set to rise slightly over the next 12 months, a new survey has found.

Government Agencies to Clash in Upcoming Case on Sexual Orientation

By Erin Mulvaney |

A full Second Circuit will hear from two opposing government agencies in key case on whether sexual orientation should be protected under federal civil rights law

HP Inc. and Hewlett Packard Enterprise logos.

Age Discrimination Suit Over Layoffs at HP Sent to Arbitration

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A federal judge granted HP's request to compel arbitration on the basis of a release agreement signed by former employees.

In San Francisco, A New Chasm Erupts on Legal Pay

By Rebecca Cohen |

Few occupations in San Francisco have as large a gender pay gap as the legal industry, the civic data analytics company LiveStories reported this week. And the inequality is growing.

Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

3 Key Quotes From the Uber Ninth Circuit Hearing

By Ben Hancock |

A panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on Wednesday afternoon heard oral arguments in a case that challenges arbitration agreements between Uber Technologies Inc. and its drivers as violating the National Labor Relations Act.

Facebook's Russia Problem Tests Government Affairs Team

By C. Ryan Barber |

Amid mounting scrutiny over Russian-funded web advertising during the 2016 presidential election, Facebook Inc.'s internal government affairs team in Washington and the company's network of outside advocates will be tested like no time before. Here's a look at some of the key players, the money and connections.

Tesla Motors, located at 3500 Deer Creek in Palo Alto.

New Class Action Claims Tesla Steals License Info From Test-Driving Customers

By Cogan Schneier |

The lawsuit in California accuses Tesla of using information from customers' driver's licenses for marketing, without their consent or knowledge.

Nathan Wenzel, CEO and co-founder of SimpleLegal.

4 Tools Your In-House Team Needs

By Nathan Wenzel |

Adopting technology is becoming more commonplace in legal. But, with a growing number of tools promising increased operational efficiency and reduced costs for corporate legal teams, deciding which tools are best for your department is a challenging path to navigate.

Elise Sanguinetti, founding partner with Arias Sanguinetti Stahle & Torrijos.

Op-Ed: The Consequences of a Hands-Off Approach to Self-Driving Car Regulation

By Elise Sanguinetti |

In the minds of some movers and shakers in the automobile industry, self-driving cars are the wave of the future. For investors and big business, the safe bet is that laissez-faire policies will win the day. But for consumers and workers, that very well may lead to unsafe and unstable futures.

Jared L Kopel.

3 Securities Cases to Watch at the Supreme Court This Term

By Jared L. Kopel |

Three significant securities law decisions highlight the new Supreme Court session, which will be the first complete term for Justice Neil Gorsuch.

U.S. District Judge William Alsup of the Northern District of California

As Trial Date Nears, Stakes in 'Waymo v. Uber' Hit at Least $2.6B

By Ross Todd |

The partial price tag is for just one of nine allegedly stolen trade secrets.

California State Attorney General Xavier Becerra.

California Attorney General Will Take Trump's Border Wall to Court

By Cheryl Miller |

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra is preparing to sue to block the first phase of President Donald Trump's planned wall along the Mexican border, state officials said Wednesday morning.

Will Your Case Go to Trial? This Computer Program Might Know the Answer

By Jenna Greene |

Wondering whether a given lawsuit will go to trial? SettlementAnalytics unveiled a new tool to predict the likelihood. But some Big Law litigators are skeptical that all the intangibles that determine the course of litigation can be factored in.

Uber CLO Salle Yoo

Where Will Uber CLO Salle Yoo Land Next?

By Stephanie Forshee and Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

Salle Yoo is officially out at Uber. But where is she headed?

Uber sticker on a parked car on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.  September 4, 2015.  Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

A Primer on Uber's Big Day at the Ninth Circuit

By Ben Hancock |

The appeals court will be weighing issues critical to the fate of major driver class actions against Uber and workers' collective rights generally.

Xavier Becerra, Attorney General of California, testifies before Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, during a hearing titled “S.1693, The Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act of 2017,

Xavier Becerra Urges Tech Companies to 'Join Us' on Internet Liability Bill

By Cheryl Miller |

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra in Washington on Tuesday urged tech companies to "join us at the table" to craft federal legislation to crack down on online sex trafficking. The general counsel to the Internet Association, representing major U.S. companies, tells a U.S. Senate committee the bill "introduces overly broad concepts of criminal and civil liability."

On the Move Stock Art Vertical

On the Move: Tracking the Ins and Outs of California Lawyers

By Pearl Wu |

New hires, promotions, appointments and awards in-house, at firms and in government and academia.

Uber Files $50M Fraud Suit Against Digital Ad Agency

By Ross Todd |

According to the complaint, Uber spent more than $82.5 million in an ad campaign directed by Fetch Media Ltd. from 2016 through the first quarter of this year.

Kevin Johnson, left, and Kelly Lake, right.

UC Law Schools Orchestrate 2-Day Civil Rights Conference

By Angela Morris |

The four University of California law schools—Berkeley School of Law, UCLA School of Law, UC Davis School of Law, and UC Irvine School of Law—have created "Civil Rights in the 21st Century," as a call to students and young lawyers to public-service law work in areas ranging from immigration to water rights to police accountability.

Wanji Walcott, senior vice president and  general counsel, PayPal

PayPal GC Is a Top Advocate—for Her Business and Beyond

By David Ruiz |

Wanji Walcott, PayPal general counsel and senior vice president, brings passion for diversity, inclusion, pro bono work and tech transactions to the online payments company.

Left to right: Randy Evans and Shari Klevens, Dentons partners

Five Common Issues in Law Firm Mergers

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |

Over the past several years, law firm mergers have become the new normal in the legal industry. It seems that, at one point or another, nearly every midsize or large law firm has either merged with another firm, or was at least rumored to be in talks with other firms regarding a possible merger.

Johnson & Johnson's baby powder.

J&J Aims to Wipe Out $417M Talc Verdict, Citing 'Passion and Prejudice' of Jurors

By Amanda Bronstad |

Johnson & Johnson has filed motions to toss a record $417 million talcum powder verdict based in part on the alleged misconduct of jurors in the deliberations room.

sodas

Appeals Court Halts San Francisco's Soda Health Warnings

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

The city of San Francisco tasted a bitter defeat on Tuesday, at least temporarily, as a federal appeals court put a hold on its plans to label sugary-drink ads with health warnings.

Julie Q. Brush, Solutus Legal Search .

Should You Send a Thank You Note After an Interview?

By Julie Brush |

A simple question. And a simple answer: Absolutely. Positively. Always.

GRE Gaining Traction as Alternative Test for Law School Admission

By KAREN SLOAN |

The GRE is building momentum among the law school admissions community as an alternative to the LSAT, a new survey says.

clock-money

California's Push to Boost Overtime Eligibility, Mirroring Obama Rules, Fails in Legislature

By Cheryl Miller |

California legislation that would have increased the number of workers eligible for overtime pay died in the final hours of the state's 2017 legislative session Saturday, ending a push to revive Obama-era rules that the Trump administration has moved to undo.

Thousands of protesters spill onto 7th Street in San Francisco after President Donald Trump announced ending the Obama-era Deferred  Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

States, Schools and Dreamers: Courts Bombarded With DACA Suits

By Cogan Schneier |

With two new challenges filed Monday, there are now half a dozen lawsuits over the Trump administration’s rescission of the DACA program.

Irvine-based IP boutique Fish IP Law has sued Fish & Richardson seeking a ruling that its name and logo don't infringe on the larger firm's trademarks. Here is an examble from the exibit in the lawsuit.

Fish Fight: Fish IP Law Sues Fish & Richardson in Trademark Spat

By Ross Todd |

In the Fishiest IP dispute you're likely to see, Fish IP Law has sued Fish & Richardson seeking a ruling that its name and logo don't infringe the megafirm's registered and common law trademarks.

Uber headquarters in San Francisco.

Uber May Name Expedia Alum to Lead Its Legal Department

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

A report has surfaced that Burke Norton of Salesforce.com will soon be headed to Uber as head of its legal department.

Litigation Funder Longford Raises $500M as Industry Stays Flush

By Roy Strom |

Longford Capital Management LP on Monday announced the latest headline figure in the litigation finance industry. Longford said it raised $500 million for a second fund that will dwarf the initial $56.5 million fund that the Chicago-based firm raised three years ago.

Web Privacy Bill, to Replace Rules Trump Repealed, Dies in California Legislature

By Cheryl Miller |

A California bill that would have restricted the ability of internet service providers to collect and sell consumer information without permission died early Saturday amid a strong lobbying push from telecommunications and tech companies to stop the privacy measure.

Quinn Emanuel Brings Back Its Real-Life Olivia Pope

By Rebecca Cohen |

Crystal Nix-Hines, a former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, has returned to Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan as a partner in Los Angeles. The former reporter for The New York Times has also moonlighted as a television show script writer.

Judge: Del. Vacancies a Reason for Transfer of Apple Infringement Suit to Calif.

By Tom McParland |

A federal judge in Delaware on Sept. 15 cited the district's depleted bench as a reason for transferring a patent infringement suit against Apple Inc. to California, saying the case would have put an undue burden on an already overworked court.

Judge Jon Tigar, United States District Court for the Northern District of California

Did McKool Smith Violate Prosecution Bar in High-Profile Patent Case?

By Scott Graham |

A ruling from U.S. District Judge Jon Tigar in San Francisco could threaten a new litigation campaign by McKool client Eolas Technologies against Amazon, Google and Wal-Mart.

Uber self driving car

Biggest Issue for Autonomous Car Lawyers? Managing Liability, Akin Partner Says

By Cheryl Miller |

The U.S. Transportation Department rolled out new guidance this week for driverless car manufacturers. We spoke with Susan Lent in Washington, head of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld's infrastructure and transportation practice, about these changes and what they mean for the industry and her practice.

Cobra-Sexual-Energy

Ninth Circuit Eases Time for Appeal of Class Certification Rulings

By Amanda Bronstad |

In a case over a purported aphrodisiac dietary supplement that promised "animal magnetism," the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, splitting with nearly half the country's federal appellate courts on a matter of first impression, decided to expand the time available to ask for reconsideration of decertification.

Left to right: Joe Arpaio and Donald Trump.

Q&A: Covington & Burling Partner Takes On Arpaio, Again

By Cogan Schneier |

Covington & Burling's Stanley Young is still fighting against Sheriff Joe Arpaio in court, despite his pardon from President Donald Trump.

Michael J. Mandelbrot, of The Asbestos Legal Center, in San Francisco.

Asbestos Lawyer May Get Second Chance to Petition Trust

By Amanda Bronstad |

A plaintiffs attorney who was debarred from filing claims with an asbestos trust could get another shot after a federal appeals court found possible violations of California law.

The Recorder Announces 2017 In-House Legal Departments of the Year

By Ross Todd |

The Recorder is recognizing NetApp and Lyft as the winners of its annual In-House Legal Departments of the Year awards.

Emily Robinson, right, co-director, Loyola Immigrant Justice Clinic, interviews a client at LosAngeles' Dolores Mission Church, where the LIJC conducts client intake sessions.

As ‘Dreamer’ Deadline Looms, Law Schools’ Immigration Clinics Scramble to Help

By KAREN SLOAN |

Emily Robinson’s phone has been ringing incessantly since Sept. 5, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the repeal of DACA—the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program that protects certain undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children from deportation.

'Moving from over 120 firms to just one' - Eversheds Sutherland wins sole adviser appointment for Turkish Airlines

By ALEX BERRY |

Eversheds Sutherland has been appointed as the sole global legal adviser to Turkish Airlines for an initial three-year period.

David King

Kirkland Has a New Private Equity King in San Francisco

By Rebecca Cohen |

David King, a former Simpson Thacher & Bartlett associate who spent nearly the past seven years at buyout giant The Carlyle Group LP, has joined Kirkland & Ellis as an investment funds partner in the Bay Area.

Adam Hofmann of Hanson Bridgett.

Cal Supremes Limit Prop 218’s Impact on Tax Initiatives, but Less Than You Might Think

By Adam Hofmann |

On Aug. 28, 2017, the California Supreme Court issued a 5-2 split decision in California "Cannabis Coalition v. City of Upland," S234148. Immediate responses from many commentators reflect an expansive view of this decision, including a perception that the case could pave the way for communities to establish special taxes with majority voter approval, rather than the 2/3 required by Article XIII C, section 2. An alternate reading of the case, however, suggests a narrower impact from the decision.

Jeffrey Moorad.

Morgan Lewis Doubles Down on Sports With Ex-Padres Owner

By Lizzy McLellan |

Morgan, Lewis & Bockius is stepping up its game in sports law with a splashy California hire and the creation of its newest industry group.

Medical marijuana

A New Leaf: How 1 CLO Works With Cannabis Industry

By David Ruiz |

Despite a complex network of regulations on cannabis sales, few dispensaries have a full-time in-house counsel. But one cannabis-related company just hired its first CLO.

Banking Lobbyists, After Wells Fargo Scandal, Couldn't Stop This Arbitration Bill

By Cheryl Miller |

California's governor and Legislature in recent years have not been welcoming of many bills aimed at restricting the use of arbitration. That could soon change. Gov. Jerry Brown is considering whether to sign legislation that would allow judges to deny a bank's arbitration demand in any case that involves fraudulently created accounts.

The Recorder Names the 2017 Corporate Departments of the Year

By Ross Todd |

Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher has taken home the overall prize in The Recorder's Corporate Department of the Year contest, which honors firms whose California lawyers worked on the biggest, most complex and trendsetting deals this past year. Sidley Austin and Simpson Thacher & Bartlett, which both worked on blockbuster deals of their own, have been named finalists in the overall competition.

The Recorder Announces 2017 Litigation Departments of the Year

By Ross Todd |

The Recorder is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2017 Litigation Departments of the Year. The awards recognize law firms whose California litigators have delivered outstanding service—and wins—for their clients in the year's most demanding litigation matters.

Google offices in Mountain View.

Gender-Pay Suit Against Google Seeks 'Fairness for Women'

By Erin Mulvaney |

A class action filed Thursday against Google Inc. claims the tech company systemically pays women less than men in similar jobs and also enables unequal promotions and opportunities for male and female workers.

Uber-Car

Judge OKs Overtime Claims Against Uber, Tees Up Central Employment Issue

By Max Mitchell |

A federal judge has rejected Uber's bid to halt a class action lawsuit over the company's overtime pay practices, and ordered the parties to address whether Uber drivers are employees or independent contractors under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Concept of the road to success with a businessman standing on the road.

Atrium Launches as a Firm-Startup Pair

By Gabrielle Orum Hernández |

Atrium’s law firm will cater to the early stage startup community, while its software company will cater to its law firm.

Tom Gaynor, Nixon Peabody

Nixon Peabody's On-Site Incubator a Boost for LGBT Entrepreneurs

By Angela Morris |

The firm has donated 2,300 square feet of its 16th floor San Francisco office and partnered with a nonprofit business accelerator to launch the StartOut Growth Lab.

DOJ: Google Won't Fight New Warrants for Overseas Data

By Ben Hancock |

The development marks a reversal of the company’s legal strategy on the issue of law enforcement access to data stored abroad.

Waymo driverless vehicle.

Waymo Will Get Driverless Car Due Diligence Report, but Little Time to Use It

By Scott Graham |

An order Wednesday from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit could release evidence against Uber in a court battle that's speeding toward trial. An Uber spokesperson said that's not the case.

Equifax's headquarters in Atlanta.

Equifax's Latest Legal Nightmare Might Be This Chatbot

By Gabrielle Orum Hernández |

DoNotPay's latest chatbot release can help you sue Equifax for negligence in small-claims court. But what impact may it have on consumer protection?

Mobile data business

Technology is the Solution: What Law Firms Can Learn From LegalZoom

By Jeff Unger, eMinutes |

If law firms used technology to automate tasks, lower prices and give personalized advice, they’d have an undeniable competitive advantage.

Uber headquarters, located at 1455 Market St. in San Francisco, CA.

Uber and Execs Bring on Defense Heavy Hitters in India Rape Case

By Ross Todd |

Uber Technologies and a group of former executives have brought on lawyers from O'Melveny, Orrick, Latham, and Hogan Lovells to defend against a privacy and defamation suit brought by a woman raped by an Uber driver in New Delhi in 2014.

Julie Q. Brush, Solutus Legal Search .

Why Would Company Execs Want Their GC to Report to the CFO?

By Julie Brush |

The GC reporting structure is one of the most talked about topics among in-house lawyers today. And there is no shortage of opinions on the matter.

Uber CLO Salle Yoo

Chief Legal Officer Salle Yoo Will Leave Uber

By David Ruiz |

After five years with the ride-hailing giant, Yoo will leave the company she helped build.

Left to right: Randy Evans and Shari Klevens, Dentons partners

Is It Time to Change Legal Malpractice Insurers?

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |

While every firm typically has unique considerations in deciding whether to change insurers, there are certain issues that may warrant exploring the options when renewal time is approaching.

Theodore Boutrous Jr. of Gibson Dunn,

Citing the Pope, Catholic Bishops Bash Travel Ban With Help From Gibson Dunn

By Cogan Schneier |

Gibson lawyers filed an amicus brief with the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday on behalf of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Robert Sutton, author of the book “The No Asshole Rule

How to Deal With Assholes

By Vivia Chen |

Stanford University professor Robert Sutton just released his book, "The Asshole Survival Guide." Here's what the authority on corporate A-holes has to say.

Uber-Self-Driving Car

Trump's Autonomous Car Guidance Puts Automakers in Driver's Seat

By Cheryl Miller |

U.S. Department of Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao on Tuesday rolled out revamped federal guidance for autonomous vehicle manufacturers, putting the Trump administration's deregulatory stamp on this fast-developing industry.

Robert Kadlec

Longtime Sidley Partner Lands at Duane Morris' LA Office

By Rebecca Cohen |

Duane Morris has hired Sidley Austin corporate partner Robert Kadlec in Los Angeles, where the Philadelphia-based Am Law 100 firm bolstered its local operations earlier this year after absorbing a local corporate boutique.

Lawyer Who Took Funds From Armenian Genocide Charity Faces Disbarment

By Ross Todd |

A state bar judge has recommended that Rita Mahdessian be disbarred for misappropriating $30,000 from a trust fund for survivors of the Armenian genocide and using other trust money to pay for her children's law school.

Anjali Kumar, Cheddar Chief People Officer & General Counsel

Cheddar Names Google, Warby Parker Vet as General Counsel

By Stephanie Forshee |

Cheddar Inc. has named Anjali Kumar general counsel and chief people officer.

Ralph Baxter, Chairman and Chief Executive officer of Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP.

Ex-Orrick Leader Finally Ready to Run for Congress

By Brian Baxter |

Ralph Baxter Jr., a former CEO of Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe who retired to West Virginia four years ago, will announce Tuesday that he is going to run for Congress in the 2018 midterm elections. He spoke with The American Lawyer about the path that led him to pursue a new career in public service.

Self-portrait of a female Celebes crested macaque (Macaca nigra) in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, who had picked up photographer David Slater's camera and photographed herself with it.

Monkey Authors Will Have to Wait Another Day for Copyrights

By Scott Graham |

PETA agreed to drop its fight to establish copyright ownership for Naruto, a crested macaque who it claims took the famous "monkey selfie."

Judges Look to Profs in Awarding Lower Percentage Fees in Biggest Class Actions

By Amanda Bronstad |

Larger common funds in class actions typically yield smaller percentage fees for lawyers, according to two studies relied upon by federal judges in determining attorney fees awards in some of the nation's largest class action settlements.

ice-agents

This California Bill Would Restrict Immigration Enforcement in State Courts

By Cheryl Miller |

A Los Angeles lawmaker says he'll pursue a bill in January that would bar federal immigration agents from arresting or questioning undocumented immigrants in state courthouses unless they first obtain a warrant.

Kent and Jill Easter.

Disbarment for Lawyer Involved in Drug-Planting Plot

By Scott Flaherty |

Kent Easter, a California lawyer, has been prohibited from practicing law after he was found guilty of planting drugs in the car of a parent at his son's elementary school.

San Francisco skyline with Golden Gate Bridge

After 'Sanctuary City' Win Against Trump, SF Faces Taxpayer Immigration Suit

By Ross Todd |

While the city and county have repeatedly gone to court to challenge President Donald Trump's efforts to financially penalize so-called "sanctuary cities," San Francisco faces an immigration-related lawsuit of its own from taxpayer Cynthia Cerletti.

U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C.

Equifax, Before Breach, Lobbied to Limit Class-Action Damages

By C. Ryan Barber |

In the months before revealing a data breach that potentially exposed the personal information of nearly half the adult U.S. population, Equifax Inc. turned to the firm Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld in Washington to help convince U.S. lawmakers to reduce penalties for companies that violated the federal fair credit-reporting law.

U.S. Patent & Trademark Office.

In Win for Patent Owners, PTAB Clamps Down on Repeat Attacks

By Scott Graham |

The Patent Trial and Appeal Board will no longer tolerate multiple, serial petitions for inter partes review that target the same patent claims.

Read What California-Licensed Lawyers Said About Lowering the Exam Score

By Cheryl Miller |

Thousands of California-licensed lawyers responded to the state bar's call for public comment about whether the bar exam score should be lowered or kept right where it is. Attorneys offered varying thoughts. Here's a snapshot of some of what members of the bar had to say.

5 Things to Know About the First Wave of Equifax Actions

By Amanda Bronstad |

A major theme in the suits will be how Equifax, whose entire business as a credit reporting agency is to maintain personal and confidential data on individuals, wasn't prepared for hackers who have hit retailers and health care companies for that same information.

Lewis Brisbois Practice Leader Lands at Jackson Lewis in LA

By Rebecca Cohen |

Jackson Lewis has landed Tracy Costantino, a partner and vice chair of the wage-and-hour class actions practice at Lewis Brisbois, as a partner in Los Angeles.

Qualcomm Headquarters in San Diego, CA.

Qualcomm Slammed in Patent Brawl With Apple

By Scott Graham |

U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel refused to block Apple from suing Qualcomm overseas or to order the resumption of royalty payments while the litigation plays out.

Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano answers questions before the Senate Judiciary Committee. May 6, 2009. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

University of California, With Covington's Help, Sues Trump Over DACA

By Cogan Schneier |

UC president Janet Napolitano signed the directive implementing DACA when she was secretary of homeland security in 2012.

FTC's First Action Against a Social Media 'Influencer' Might Not Be Last

By C. Ryan Barber |

The Federal Trade Commission in several cases has faulted social media "influencers" for failing to disclose the payments behind their seemingly organic endorsements. But the FTC had only reached settlements with the companies, raising a question of when—if ever—the agency would directly go after the influencers. That time has come. The agency this week took its first action against an influencer.

Persky Fundraiser Promises 'An Evening With Judges' Who Support Him

By Ben Hancock |

Critics and some experts say involving other judges in a political campaign toes close to ethical limits. But Judge Aaron Persky's supporters refute that.

Sidley Austin offices in Washington, D.C.

In City of Stars, Sidley Snags Appellate 'Van Damme'

By Rebecca Cohen |

Jean-Claude “J.C.” André, who spent the past decade as a federal prosecutor in Los Angeles, has joined Sidley Austin as a partner in its U.S. Supreme Court and appellate practice in the same city.

U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, where a three-judge panel heard arguments on the halting of the immigration ban.

Ninth Circuit Sides With Hawaii, Rules Grandparents Exempt From Trump's Travel Ban

By Cogan Schneier |

The court upheld a district court ruling that said grandparents of U.S. citizens and other family members of U.S. residents are exempt from President Donald Trump's travel ban executive order.

U.S. Justice Department building in Washington

Trump's DOJ Backs Colorado Baker Who Refused Service to Gay Couple

By Marcia Coyle |

The Trump administration delivered a new blow to the gay and lesbian community on Thursday when the U.S. Justice Department sided against a same-sex couple in a major discrimination case at the U.S. Supreme Court. The Justice Department filed a brief backing a Colorado baker who refused to bake a cake for a gay couple. "Weddings are sacred rites in the religious realm and profoundly symbolic ceremonies in the secular one," Jeffrey Wall, the acting U.S. solicitor general, wrote in the amicus brief.

On the Move: Tracking the Ins and Outs of California Lawyers

By Pearl Wu |

New hires, promotions, appointments and awards in-house, at firms and in government and academia.

Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305

Bay Area Federal Judges Dish on Courtroom Dos and Don’ts

By David Ruiz |

A panel of four Northern District of California judges discussed what they appreciate from presenting counsel, and what they value in lawyers.

Bruce Sewell, Apple’s general counsel and senior vice president of Legal and Government Affairs. HANDOUT.

Tech GCs Want Courts to Help With Targeted Discovery Processes

By David Ruiz |

Apple’s GC raised the idea of targeted discovery to lower the cost and time of litigation, and fellow tech GCs asked for the courts help in making it happen.

U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

Trump Makes First Ninth Circuit Pick Setting Up Senate Fight

By Ross Todd |

Prior to joining the U.S. Attorney's Office, Ryan Bounds served at the White House as special assistant to President George W. Bush for justice and immigration policy and at the Justice Department as chief of staff and deputy assistant attorney general for the Office of Legal Policy.

Left to right: Randy Evans and Shari Klevens, Dentons partners

Protecting Law Firm Devices

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |

In the modern practice of law, arguably nothing is more important to an attorney than her laptop. With the rise of electronic document management systems, the laptop can act as the equivalent of an entire office building of documents and allow the attorney to work from virtually anywhere.

Lexshares homepage.

LexShares Eyes $25M for New Litigation Investment Fund

By Ben Hancock |

The move represents a new foray for the litigation finance company, which previously only allowed investors to bet directly on individual cases.

Hartley West, Kobre & Kim

Cross-Border Criminal Investigations Just Became More Complicated

By Hartley M.K. West, Steven G. Kobre and Michael F. Peng |

The future of cross-border government enforcement investigations has been shaken by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit's recent decision in United States v. Allen, 864 F.3d 63 (2d Cir. 2017), which held that the Fifth Amendment's prohibition on the use of compelled testimony in criminal proceedings applies even when that testimony was compelled by a foreign official in a foreign investigation. Allen's ramifications are far-reaching and may put pressure on other circuits, including the Ninth, to embrace the holding or disavow it.

Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati

Summer's End Sees Partner Departures Mount at Wilson Sonsini

By Brian Baxter and Rebecca Cohen |

The first week of September saw Latham & Watkins pick up Wilson Sonsini’s privacy and data protection co-chair Michael Rubin, while three other Wilson Sonsini partners are poised to join Cooley. Matthew Sonsini, the son of Wilson Sonsini's septuagenarian chairman Larry Sonsini, has also left the firm for another family business.

Joshua Briones.

From Migrant Field Worker to Big Law Managing Partner—The Remarkable Journey of Joshua Briones

By Jenna Greene |

By the time he was 8 years old, Joshua Briones was rising before dawn to pick strawberries and cherry tomatoes, moving from town to town in California with his immigrant farm worker parents. Today, Briones, 44, is the managing partner of Mintz Levin Cohn Ferris Glovsky and Popeo’s Los Angeles office and a lauded litigator. This is the story of his remarkable journey,

Andrei Iancu, Irell & Manella

Irell & Manella Taps New Leader Ahead of Iancu's Potential Departure

By Rebecca Cohen |

Ellisen Turner has been named the next managing partner of Irell & Manella as the Los Angeles-based firm’s current leader, Andrei Iancu, was recently nominated to head the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

Lyft

Gig Companies Wary of Any Potential Policy Changes to Labor Structure

By Erin Mulvaney |

Any policy changes proposed by Congress to regulate the gig economy should not tamp down on the businesses' ability to grow, the leader of the association that represents Google, Microsoft and other major companies in the technology industry told a U.S. House committee Wednesday.

bar-exam

State Bar Leaves Reducing Exam Score for Supreme Court to Resolve

By Cheryl Miller |

California state bar trustees on Wednesday punted the fate of the bar exam pass score to the California Supreme Court, offering the justices a range of choices on the controversial issue, from leaving the score at 144 to lowering it to 139.

Bryan Cave, University of Colorado Partner for Legal Tech Internship

By Rhys Dipshan |

As a part of the Tech Lawyer Accelerator Program, a law student will join Bryan Cave’s outside counsel team in developing contract management systems for Red Robin’s legal department.

Petitions for Rehearing En Banc in the Ninth Circuit

By Polly J. Estes, California Appellate Law Group |

You've lost your appeal in the U.S. Court of Appeals Ninth Circuit and are certain the panel erred. Now what? Before running to the Supreme Court, which very rarely grants review, you should consider filing a petition for (panel) rehearing (PFR), or a petition for rehearing en banc (PFREB), or a combined PFR/PFREB, which is what almost everyone files.

Data privacy concept.

With End-to-End Encryption, Compliance Trouble Brewing for Legal

By Rhys Dipshan |

An almost air-tight protection, end-to-end encryption can stop internal compliance or e-discovery efforts dead in their tracks.

Stephen Paffrath, left, and Michael Lane, right, of Greenberg Traurig.

Four Tips for Defense Counsel Considering Removal to Federal Court

By Michael D. Lane and Stephen Paffrath |

One of the first questions defense counsel may ask when reviewing a new state court complaint, or an amended complaint, is "Can we remove to federal court?" There are many good reasons for a defendant to want to be in federal court, including having a single assigned Article III judge with top law school clerks to review motions, federal discovery rules that may limit fishing expeditions and a unanimous jury requirement.

Curtis Smolar, Legalist

Legalist, AI-Based Lit Funder, Hires Its First Lawyer

By Ben Hancock |

Curtis Smolar will help navigate the company through regulatory requirements and help assess the value of cases it invests in.

Ex-Sedgwick Partner Who Sued Firm Finds New Home as Defections Continue

By Roy Strom and James Booth |

Traci Ribeiro, who settled a gender bias case against Sedgwick earlier this year, has found a new home. Meanwhile, other lawyers have left the firm in New York and Florida.

DLA Piper Picks Up Jones Day Insolvency Pro

By Rebecca Cohen |

Joshua Morse, who joined Jones Day five years ago from now-defunct Dewey & LeBoeuf, is headed to DLA Piper in the Bay Area.

Federal Demand for Medical Marijuana Data in California Raises Privacy Alarms

By Cheryl Miller |

A federal official with an anti-drug agency has asked California for demographic data about the 86,723 patients who have obtained medical marijuana user cards, raising privacy alarms among cannabis advocates.

Takeaways From Day 1 of GrubHub's Worker Classification Trial

By Ben Hancock |

The case won't decide the worker classification issue for the whole "gig economy"—but its outcome could have symbolic weight.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced on Tuesday the Trump administration is ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Thorny Battles Loom for Lawsuits Against Trump’s DACA Repeal

By Cogan Schneier |

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Tuesday that the Department of Homeland Security will phase out the program, but will not cancel any existing work permits.

Digital Ad Company Can't Use Verizon's Arbitration Agreement to Block Privacy Claims: Court

By C. Ryan Barber |

A federal appeals panel on Tuesday rejected a digital advertising firm's effort to invoke Verizon Wireless' arbitration agreement to push a subscriber class action over data collection practices out of court.

Kona Brewing Company Big Wave Golden Ale.

Alo-nah: 'Kona' Beer Maker Can't Shake Consumer Suit Over Brewing Stateside

By Ross Todd |

Trouble could be, ahem, brewing for the maker of the Hawaiian-themed Kona Brewing Co. line of beers.

Chiangmai, Thailand, - July 21, 2017 : hand holding iPhone6s and using Uber app on road with car, Uber is smartphone app based transportation network

How Uber's Legal Department Can Improve Its Board Relationship

By Stephanie Forshee and Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

In the coming months, Uber's in-house lawyers and its board of directors may be getting to know each other quite well.

Transgender Military Ban Targeted by One of the World's Most Powerful Law Firms

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

Latham & Watkins represents the LGBT civil rights group Equality California and several transgender members of the military in a federal lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of President Donald Trump's Aug. 25 directive.

L-R Robert Stumpf Jr., Karin Vogel and John Brooks

Should You Appeal? Top 10 Things to Consider

By Robert J. Stumpf Jr., Karin Vogel and John Brooks |

It's no fun to lose, particularly in a trial court. When you do, your first instinct may be to appeal. That may be just fine, but sometimes it isn't. Before you take that next step, here are 10 questions to consider.

Julie Q. Brush, Solutus Legal Search .

Will an Inflated Title Hurt My Marketability in the Job Market?

By Julie Brush |

While it is uncommon for a young, more inexperienced lawyer to achieve the designation and status of general counsel (GC) in an organization, it does occur (primarily in private/emerging growth organizations). And while there are virtues to such a meteoric rise, there can also be challenges.

Winston & Strawn's Expansion Efforts Continue in California

By Rebecca Cohen |

The Am Law 100 firm, which has been busy on the lateral hiring front in 2017, has added two intellectual property partners in Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Marijuana

Lawmakers Pass on Pot Bills, Giving State Regs a Chance

By Cheryl Miller |

California lawmakers have killed a handful of bills aimed at regulating the state's pending recreational marijuana market, an apparent nod to the governor's desire to craft such rules through executive agencies.

John Sganga, Jr., partner at Knobbe Martens Olson & Bear. HANDOUT.

In Federal Circuit Win, Knobbe Defends $91M Award for Stolen Biotech Trade Secrets

By Scott Graham |

Partner John Sganga Jr. argued the case for CardiAQ Valve Technologies Inc., which accused its one-time partner of secretly developing a competing heart valve design.

Judge William Orrick III, U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California

Federal Judge Sanctions Two California Lawyers in Abortion Videos Case

By Cheryl Miller |

A federal judge has sanctioned two California lawyers for civil contempt rooted in their roles in posting secretly recorded videos of abortion providers that had been barred from public release by an injunction. Judge William Orrick, however, in his sanctions order, slashed the fees requested by the Morrison & Foerster team that represented the plaintiff, the National Abortion Federation, in the suit.

Dara Khosrowshahi.

With Dealmaker In CEO Seat at Uber, Should M&A Lawyers Brace Themselves?

By Stephanie Forshee and David Ruiz |

New Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi could be gearing the company and its legal department up for some big transactions.

The Cost of Making Partner and How Senior Associates Should Prepare

By Brenda Sapino Jeffreys |

Newly minted partners may want to live that partner lifestyle, but there are some financial adjustments that need to be planned for.

SoFi Website

SoFi CEO Added as Defendant in Expanded Harassment Complaint

By Stephanie Forshee |

The amended claim says the CEO and other executives fostered a "culture of male bravado" that empowered other managers to engage in misconduct.

Aaron Persky.

Persky Plans Appeal in Bid to Stop Recall Effort

By Ben Hancock |

Lawyers say they will continue to argue that the recall process started against the judge who sentenced Brock Turner violates the California Constitution.

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. at the downtown Washington office of Covington & Burling on June 30, 2015.

Eric Holder's Advice to Jeff Sessions: Don't Force Career Staff to 'Defend the Indefensible'

By Mike Scarcella and Cheryl Miller |

From one U.S. attorney general to another, Eric Holder Jr. recently offered Jeff Sessions some leadership advice. Holder's observations were not solicited. "I urge you not to force them to further defend the indefensible—the president's inhumane and unjust executive orders," the Covington & Burling partner wrote to Sessions. Holder's letter, written on behalf of the California Senate, was attached to an amicus brief California lawmakers filed in support of Chicago's challenge to Trump administration immigration policies.

In-House and Outside Counsel Can Expect Higher Salaries in 2018, Study Says

By David Ruiz |

The best way to attract high-quality lawyers is to pay them competitively, according to Robert Half Legal's 2018 Salary Guide, which breaks down attorney pay in the United States.

The justices of the U.S. Supreme Court gather for an official group portrait to include new Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch, top row, far right, Thursday. June 1, 2017, at the Supreme Court Building in Washington. Seated, front row, from left are, Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Associate Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, and Associate Justice Stephen Breyer. Back row, standing, from left are, Associate Justice Elena Kagan, Associate Justice Samuel Alito Jr., Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, and Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch.

Supreme Court Preview: Blockbuster Cases Likely to Deliver a Contentious, Consequential Fall Term

By Tony Mauro and Marcia Coyle |

If last term was the relatively quiet "calm before the storm" for the U.S. Supreme Court, then get ready. The clouds are gathering.

Alisha Marks Tischler, Executive Vice President of Schwartz Media Strategies.

Instagram: The Next Frontier for Law Firm Branding

By ALISHA MARKS TISCHLER |

Law firms are finally catching on to the social media craze after years of reluctance that saw companies in other industries strengthen their brands online. A My Case study found that 57 percent of law firms now maintain a LinkedIn presence, 35 percent are on Facebook and 21 percent are using Twitter.

California Bar Committee Endorses Lowering Exam Pass-Score

By Cheryl Miller |

A California State Bar committee stocked with law school deans recommended on Wednesday that the Supreme Court reduce the bar exam passing score from 144 to as low as 135. The Law School Council endorsed setting the state's passing score between 135 and 139, a lower range than the 141 to 144 that a previous bar-commissioned study had suggested.

The famous catch by former UCLA football player Rodney Lee.

Loeb & Loeb's Latest Lateral Hire Has Some College Football History

By Roy Strom |

Trusts and estates litigator Rodney Lee joined Loeb & Loeb’s Los Angeles office last month from a mid-size firm in Beverly Hills. But Lee’s new partners may remember him for making one of the greatest catches in UCLA football history in a game that helped the Bruins defeat archrival USC in 1996.

Protesters against Donald Trump's executive order at John F. Kennedy International Airport

Settlement Reached on First Trump Travel Ban

By Andrew Denney |

The settlement was reached as attorneys from the ACLU and other groups representing those affected by both travel bans prepare to clash with government attorneys before the U.S. Supreme Court for oral arguments over a revised travel ban released in March. 

Solar Eclipse 2017 in Columbia, South Carolina

Amazon's Recall of Solar Eclipse Glasses Was 'Tragically Too Little, Too Late': Lawsuit

By C. Ryan Barber |

"We recommend that you DO NOT use this product to view the sun or the eclipse," Amazon reportedly told consumers who bought certain special glasses to watch the Aug. 21 solar eclipse. Amazon is now the target of a class action in a Charleston, South Carolina, federal district court, where five law firms teamed up to sue the online retail giant over its alleged inadequate recall notification before the Aug. 21 eclipse.

A license plate reader on a Newport News, Virginia, police car. (AP Photo/Daily Press, Joe Fudge)

License Plate Data Can Be Disclosed, Calif. Supreme Court Rules

By Ben Hancock |

The decision is a victory for civil liberties groups who say they are trying to expose the pervasiveness of automatic license plate readers as a surveillance tool.

Manatt offices in Washington, D.C.  April 8, 2015.  Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

LA Recruiter Scores Litigation Win Against Manatt Over Laterals

By Scott Flaherty |

A California jury ordered Manatt, Phelps & Phillips to fork over $335,000 to a legal recruiter who sued the firm alleging it breached an oral contract related to its hires of financial services partners Donna Wilson and John McGuinness in 2013.

Bitcoin

An International Regulatory Shift Could Tame Cryptocurrency Market

By Ian Lopez |

On the heels of recent actions by Canadian regulators and the U.S. SEC, some countries may be regulating digital currency as securities.

A Half-Billion Dollar Bet: Burford Director Dishes on Lit Funding Industry's Future

By BEN HANCOCK |

The litigation finance industry is heating up in the U.S. as new funders enter the market and hire away Big Law attorneys to fill their ranks. Another sign of this trend: Burford Capital, one of the largest litigation funders, recently announced it had poured almost half a billion dollars into litigation finance in just the first half of this year after its game-changing acquisition of Gerchen Keller.

North Coast Brewing Co. Brother Thelonious Belgian Style Abbey Ale

You Need a License, Thelonious Monk Estate Tells Brewery

By Scott Graham |

The estate of Thelonious Monk is suing a California craft brewery for using the legendary jazz musician's name and likeness on its Brother Thelonious trappist-style ale and associated merchandise.

Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati.

Ex-Defense Department Deputy GC Joins Wilson Sonsini

By Rebecca Cohen |

Wilson Sonsini has welcomed aboard of counsel Elizabeth George, a former associate White House counsel in the Obama administration who most recently served as deputy general counsel at the U.S. Department of Defense in Washington, D.C., for its privacy and data protection practice in San Francisco.

Uber headquarters, located at 1455 Market St. in San Francisco, CA.

Action to Oust Kalanick From Uber Board Sent to Arbitrator

By Tom McParland |

A Delaware Court of Chancery judge on Wednesday sent to an arbitrator Benchmark Capital Partners' lawsuit seeking to oust Travis Kalanick from Uber Technologies Inc.'s board, avoiding for the moment a public battle over the former CEO's acquisition of three new board seats.

Julie Q. Brush, Solutus Legal Search .

How to Be the Best Candidate When Angling for a Career Move

By Julie Q. Brush |

Being a good candidate is something a lawyer has complete control over.

facebook-page

Judges' Facebook Use Could Be a Question for Florida Supreme Court

By Celia Ampel |

An attorney wants the high court to decide whether a judge created the appearance of impropriety by "friending" a lawyer on Facebook.

Can Women Ever Be Paid Less Than Men? US Appeals Court Will Take New Look

By Erin Mulvaney |

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit will revisit a pay-equality ruling that federal officials and advocacy groups argued would widen and institutionalize practices that allow women to be paid less than men based on past salaries.

Denton partners Randy Evans and Shari Klevens

Tips for Hiring Contract Attorneys

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |

As a result of the changing market for legal services, law firms are not always looking for the same type of candidate when hiring new attorneys as in the past. Because demand from clients can be uneven, particularly for litigation matters, some firms may be reluctant to commit to full-time attorneys in fear that the work won't be there permanently to justify the cost.

Need New Technology for Your Firm? 4 Proven Ways to Get Buy-In

By Joe Kelly, Legal Workspace |

IT departments understand the case for new technology, but not everyone in the firm does. Here's how to change that.

Federal Circuit Wrestles With Vulgar Trademarks in 'Fuct' Case

By Scott Graham |

Less than three months after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Lanham Act's ban on disparaging trademarks, the D.C.-based appellate court was asked to decide whether "Matal v. Tam" extends to marks that use dirty words or graphics.

Uber Employees Might Bring Their Own Devices. Should Other Companies Have BYOD?

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

BYOD is a growing trend that's all but impossible to fight, according to in-house lawyers.

In Bid to Retain Talent, Quinn Emanuel Creates New Bonus Pool

By Rebecca Cohen |

Second- through sixth-year associates at bonus-happy Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan will receive supplemental rewards based on the firm’s performance, chairman John Quinn announced in a memo Tuesday. But there’s a catch.

U.S. President Donald Trump

Trump Cybersecurity Council Resignations Could Mean Disruption for Cybersecurity Policy

By Gabrielle Orum Hernández |

The departure of eight members of the council could signal a strained relationship between the business sector and the government around cybersecurity policy.

Instagram: The Next Frontier for Law Firm Branding

By Commentary by Alisha Marks Tischler |

Law firms intent on branding themselves around their community, culture and clients are missing an opportunity to tap into a base of users that's 700 million strong—and growing. Instagram's audience may skew younger, but the millennials of today are the clients (and employees) of tomorrow, making the platform fertile ground for building a brand online, writes Alisha Marks Tischler.

Christopher Patti, chief campus counsel UC Berkeley.

UC Berkeley Chief Campus Counsel Killed in Hit-and-Run

By David Ruiz |

Christopher Patti died Sunday in Sonoma County during a bike ride.

Andrei Iancu, Irell & Manella

Trump PTO Pick Gets Boost From IP Bar, Patent Lobbies

By Scott Graham |

But biotech and pharmaceutical groups are in wait-and-see mode on the expected nomination of Irell & Manella partner Andrei Iancu to head the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

Aaron Persky.

Judge Allows Persky Recall Effort to Move Forward

By Ben Hancock |

Kay Tsenin, a retired San Francisco Superior Court judge, said at the end of an hour-long hearing that the recall campaign could begin collecting signatures and would regain any of the 160 days they lost to gather them as a result of the TRO that was issued earlier this month.

A large crowd rallies in front of the U.S. Capitol to denounce President Donald Trump’s travel ban order.

'What Universe Does That Come From?' Key Questions From 9th Circuit Travel Ban Hearing

By Cogan Schneier |

A three-judge panel at the Ninth Circuit heard oral arguments Monday over whether a lower court’s ruling allowing grandparents and other family members of U.S. residents to enter the country was wrongly decided.

Watch Your Mouth, Your Honor: Lessons for Judges on Social Media

By Celia Ampel |

Judicial social media use is a growing topic of concern for legal ethics experts.

President Donald J. Trump leads a video teleconference monitoring current tropical storm conditions and damage assessments in southeastern Texas, Sunday, August 27, 2017, from a conference room at Camp David, near Thurmont, MD.

Amid Arpaio Storm, Calif. Moves to Restrict Immigration-Status Disclosure

By Cheryl Miller |

As California lawmakers moved Monday to shield the immigration statuses of litigants and witnesses in open court, debate continued to swirl over President Donald Trump's pardon of former Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio. Several former federal judges offered their thoughts on the president's grant of clemency.

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau building in Washington, D.C.

A Law Firm 'Cleverly' Used Ellipses to Fight a CFPB Investigation. But It Still Lost.

By C. Ryan Barber |

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has prevailed in its latest standoff with a law firm, as a federal judge ordered the California-based Seila Law to respond to the agency's demand for records related to debt relief services. A judge wasn't impressed with what she called a law firm's "cleverly" use of ellipses in the attack against the subpoena.

Justice William Bedsworth, California Court of Appeals for the Fourth District

Bedsworth: Shakespeare's Best Advice

By William W. Bedsworth |

No one really likes to write. It's too personal. It's like opening an artery and hoping people approve of the color of your blood and don't think you made too much of a mess displaying it.

Uber headquarters in San Francisco

With Uber’s New CEO Selected, Will Legal Department See Less Disruption?

By Stephanie Forshee, David Ruiz and Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

The choice of a new CEO for Uber means a new GC could be appointed soon. That new GC will face numerous challenges at the helm of the troubled company's legal function.

Manatt offices in Washington, D.C.  April 8, 2015.  Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

A New Crown Rises as Manatt's Consulting Group Breaks Away

By Rebecca Cohen |

Manatt, Phelps & Phillips’ consulting arm is no more. Monarch Global Strategies LLC opened on Aug. 1 with offices in four cities after Manatt Global Strategies closed its doors. The new venture is comprised of several Manatt Global executives, including the latter’s former president Michael Camuñez and ex-chairman James Jones.

Andrei Iancu of Irell & Manella. HANDOUT.

Irell's Andrei Iancu Is Trump's Choice for PTO Director

By Scott Graham |

Andrei Iancu, a heavy-hitting patent litigator and managing partner of Irell & Manella has been tapped to replace Michelle Lee as director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

Chess_pawns_colors

On the Move: Tracking the Ins and Outs of California Lawyers

By Pearl Wu |

New hires, promotions, appointments and awards in-house, at firms and in government and academia.

What the DreamHost/DOJ Battle Says About Search Warrants in the Digital Age

By Rhys Dipshan |

A battle over a DOJ's search warrant highlights the ongoing struggles to define the scope of search warrants and First and Fourth Amendment rights in the digital age.

Shannon Liss-Riordan.

Lawyers Sanctioned for Filing Confidential Information in Grubhub Suit

By BEN HANCOCK |

SAN FRANCISCO ­– A federal magistrate judge on Thursday sanctioned a law firm for publicly filing documents containing Grubhub Inc.’s confidential information in a lawsuit claiming the delivery service misclassified workers as contractors.

Law School Whiz Kids: Where Are They Now?

By LEIGH JONES AND KAREN SLOAN |

We recently reported that whippersnapper Aaron Parnas is starting his first year at George Washington University Law School at the tender age of 18. It got us thinking: Who else went to law school as a mere child, and what happened to them? Did they go on to accomplish great things? Did they flame out? Are they pushing up daisies? Take a look below. It’s pretty impressive – and not necessarily in a good way.

Douglas Lumish, Latham & Watkins partner

Latham Avoids DQ in Amazon Case

By Scott Graham |

A patent case filed against Amazon in Texas and transferred to California raised an interesting choice-of-law question for U.S. District Judge Jon Tigar, who ruled it's too late to disqualify Latham from the case.

Attorney Discipline

After Wedding, an Associate's Overbilling Leads to a Suspension

By Roy Strom |

A former Faegre Baker Daniels associate's law license was suspended for nine months after she inflated or fabricated time entries worth nearly $40,000 to meet a billable hour expectation. Inexcusable, sure. But an expert said it is symptomatic of the pressure Big Law lawyers face to meet hourly requirements.

Travis Kalanick, co-founder and chief executive officer of Uber Technologies Inc., gestures as he speaks during a Bloomberg Television interview in Hong Kong, China, on Thursday, July 17, 2014. As Uber disrupts the transportation market around the world, Kalanick said he sees a huge amount of growth for the car-booking service in Hong Kong. Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg *** Local Caption *** Travis Kalanick.

Hearing Set, Benchmark Hits Kalanick's Steps to Control Uber Board

By Tom MCParland |

A Delaware Court of Chancery judge on Thursday set an Aug. 30 hearing date for Travis Kalanick's motion to dismiss an investor lawsuit seeking to oust him from the Uber Technologies Inc.'s board, as Benchmark Capital Partners continued to step up its attack on the ride-hailing company's ousted CEO.

VidAngel website.

9th Circuit Upholds Injunction Against Movie-Filtering Technology

By Todd Cunningham |

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, ruling after a June argument in the Pasadena, California, U.S. courthouse, unanimously upheld an injunction entered by the federal district court on the request of three Hollywood studios: Disney, 20th Century Fox and Warner Bros. The order prevents VidAngel from selling its technology that allows people to filter movies to remove content the user finds offensive.

Senator Jeff Flake (R-AZ).  February 8, 2017.

Debate Over Ninth Circuit Split Makes for Odd Facebook Live Stream

By Ross Todd |

With Republicans controlling Congress, the threat of a split is as real as it has been in years. But the initial Facebook Live broadcast of Sen. Jeff Flake's hearing was a bit surreal.

A Wells Fargo bank in Virginia.

Wells Fargo Appeals $577K Whistleblower Award in Fake-Account Scandal

By C. Ryan Barber |

Wells Fargo, represented by Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, mounts an appeal to challenge the wrongful-termination claims of a former branch manager in California who alleged she was fired after blowing the whistle on bankers opening new accounts without proper authorization. OSHA ordered the bank to reinstate the whistleblower, and pay $577,500 in back pay and damages.

California's Prop. 66, Speeding Up Death Appeals, Survives Challenge

By Cheryl Miller |

California's Supreme Court on Thursday upheld a 2016 voter-approved initiative aimed at speeding up the state’s death penalty process. The five-member majority held, however, that Proposition 66's strict five-year deadline for courts handling appeals "must be deemed directive rather than mandatory."

Timothy Cook

Major Companies Offer Cash to Fight Hate Groups After Charlottesville Tragedy

By David Ruiz |

Donations by companies including Apple and JPMorgan Chase underscore the significance of corporate social responsibility in the Trump era.

Scenes outside the perimeter of the Inauguration of President Donald Trump on Jan. 20, 2017, in Washington, D.C.

Judge OKs Government’s Warrant for Info on Inauguration Protests, With A Catch

By Cogan Schneier |

D.C. Superior Court Judge Robert E. Morin ruled from the bench Thursday that the government can proceed with its search warrant, but must provide reports to the court on how it will search the data.

Brian Michael

LA Hire Marks King & Spalding's Latest Litigation Addition

By Rebecca Cohen |

King & Spalding has hired white-collar litigation partner Brian Michael in Los Angeles, where he was deputy general counsel at 21st Century Fox and group chief compliance officer at the Fox Networks Group. Michael comes to King & Spalding a week after the firm opened an office in Chicago by adding another ex-federal prosecutor.

Harmeet Dhillon of Dhillon Law Group

Damore—and Other Conservative Googlers—Bring On Republican Lawyer

By Ross Todd |

Harmeet Dhillon, the head of a San Francisco-based boutique and a Republican National Committee member, has signed on to consider legal options.

Lead Paint Defendants Seek to Upend $1B Public-Nuisance Finding

By Amanda Bronstad |

Three companies hit with a $1.15 billion lead paint judgment in California are hoping on Thursday to reverse a judge's finding that they created a public nuisance by promoting for decades a product that they knew was toxic.

Uber headquarters, located at 1455 Market St. in San Francisco, CA.

Susan Fowler, Uber's Thorn, Shares Her Story With the Supreme Court

By Marcia Coyle |

Susan Fowler, the former Uber engineer who exposed in a blog post her claims of a hostile work environment, tells the U.S. Supreme Court in a key workplace challenge that class action waivers in arbitration agreements unfairly allow companies to eliminate legal risks associated with systemic, illegal employment practices.

Ex-Steptoe Associate Slams Firm's Bid to Arbitrate Gender Bias Suit

By Scott Flaherty |

A former Steptoe & Johnson associate urged a Los Angeles federal court not to send a proposed class action into private arbitration, arguing that case law should prevent the firm from burying her gender bias allegations in a secret proceeding.

Logo of the NBA's Los Angles Lakers

Lakers' Losing Ways Continue in Litigation Coverage Appeal

By Ross Todd |

The Ninth Circuit handed a loss to the team which had sued to force its insurer to pay to defend a lawsuit brought under the TCPA.

NFL Franchise Moves and Controversies Create a Lucrative Playing Field for Big Law

By Todd Cunningham |

The start of the 2017 National Football League season may seem like a hot mess to fans–especially those in San Diego, St. Louis and Oakland–but it looks like another banner year for the attorneys who keep it all legal. By any measure, 2016 was a boom year for Big Law and the NFL.

Denton partners Randy Evans and Shari Klevens

Practicing Professionalism as a Lawyer

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |

Professionalism is necessary so that the practice of law may continue to survive and thrive.

Uber headquarters in San Francisco

NLRB to Argue Against Uber in Key Labor Fight in Ninth Circuit

By Erin Mulvaney |

The National Labor Relations Board will get a chance to argue against Uber Technologies Inc. in a key appeal over class actions and employment arbitration clauses that is snarled in a federal appeals court.

Checklist

Avoiding Common Errors in Employment Documents: A Checklist

By Kevin Leblang, Izabel McDonald and Sarah Hanson |

In the fast-paced world of employment law, where scandals and groundbreaking lawsuits are front page news, more mundane requirements for documentation that employers provide to candidates and employees can fall through the cracks. While these requirements may not be as sensational as the latest sexual harassment allegations or the potential repeal or scaling back of the Dodd-Frank Act, overlooking them can expose employers to potentially devastating liability.

AT&T, Telecoms Edge Toward Win in Long-Running Infringement Case

By Tom McParland |

AT&T Corp. and other phone service providers on Tuesday moved closer to ending a long-running infringement suit over systems for transmitting high-frequency data signals over telephone networks.

Marijuana

Pot Advocates Argue Against Tobacco-Styled Marketing Restrictions

By Cheryl Miller |

When it comes to regulating marijuana advertising, California lawmakers have visions of the Marlboro Man. A broad bill that has sailed through the Legislature this year would restrict marijuana branding in much the same way as tobacco promotions. Lawmakers are set to take up the measure Wednesday.

Tani Cantil-Sakauye

California's Chief Justice Raises New Alarms Over Immigration Arrests at Court

By Cheryl Miller |

California Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye on Tuesday pushed back against criticism of her pleas to federal authorities to stop courthouse arrests of undocumented immigrants, telling a Sacramento gathering that she's challenging arrest policies, not immigration laws.

Gibson Dunn's LA Office Adds Munger Tolles' Masuda

By Meghan Tribe |

Kevin Masuda, a longtime media and entertainment partner at Munger, Tolles & Olson, has joined Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher as a partner in Los Angeles.

Brian Levey, Upwork general counsel

How Upwork GC Brian Levey Helps His Company Get to the Double Bottom Line

By David Ruiz |

Under Levey's leadership, Upwork's law department is helping the company develop a new marketplace tied to contingent work.

Bill Carmody of Susman Godfrey has joined Uber's team of lawyers as it gears up for trial.

Uber Tries to Whittle Waymo's Case, as Susman Godfrey Joins Fray

By Ben Hancock |

Uber is seeking to knock out Waymo's only remaining patent claim and one trade secret claim, as the two sides gear up for trial in October.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in San Francisco, California.

Google Gets 9th Circuit Blessing for $8.5M 'Cy Pres-Only' Deal

By Ross Todd |

Objectors are hoping to create a circuit split to get the U.S. Supreme Court to review whether settlements that only fund charitable organizations are appropriate in class actions.

University of California at Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

UC Berkeley School of Law to Launch 'Hybrid' LL.M. Program

By Karen Sloan |

Students in the master of laws program will complete their spring and fall coursework online, and come to the Bay Area campus for nearly three months over one summer.

Craig Adas, left, and Alex Purtill, right, of Weil Gotshal & Manges.

Keys for Success in Shaping M&A Deals for AI Companies

By Craig Adas and Alex Purtill |

The ongoing debate among some of the most influential tech entrepreneurs regarding the inherent risks of artificial intelligence (AI) appears not to have dampened enthusiasm in boardrooms for acquisitions of AI companies this year.

Let's Talk About Charlottesville and Lawyering in the Age of Trump

By LAW.COM EDITORS |

Recent events in Charlottesville and the White House response have put the nation on edge and compelled leaders of U.S. businesses and law firms to speak out. The New York Times wrote last week that we’re witnessing a “broad recasting of the voice of business in the nation’s political and social dialogue.”

Mar 5, 2014; Charlotte, NC, USA; Indiana Pacers small forward Paul George (24) drives to the basket while being defended by Charlotte Bobcats power forward Anthony Tolliver (43) during the second half at Time Warner Cable Arena. Bobcats won 109-87. Mandatory Credit: Joshua S. Kelly-USA TODAY Sports

Wachtell, Sheppard Mullin Tapped for NBA's Paul George Probe

By Brian Baxter |

The two Am Law 100 firms are advising the National Basketball Association and Los Angeles Lakers, respectively, in an investigation into whether the latter tampered with former Indianapolis Pacers star forward Paul George.

Evan R. Chesler, a partner and the Chairman of  Cravath, Swaine and Moore, is a New York Law Journal finalist for Attorney of the Year.  ..(Photo by David Handschuh/NYLJ)

Apple Has Upper Hand at First Skirmish in All-Out War With Qualcomm

By Scott Graham |

Lawyers for Apple and Qualcomm faced off Aug. 18 in a clash over $4 billion in annual royalty payments. Cravath chairman Evan Chesler described client Qualcomm as under worldwide assault: “We are standing in a boxing ring with our gloves up, with the biggest boxer in the world punching away at us.”

Jury box.  2-9-11.  Photo by Jason Doiy...

New Evidence Seen as Key in LA Jury's $417M Talc Verdict

By Amanda Bronstad |

California jurors who awarded $417 million on Monday in a talcum powder trial might have been influenced by three new pieces of evidence, including an emailed photo that arrived just as the trial started, according to plaintiffs' attorneys in the case.

Let's Talk About Charlottesville and Lawyering in the Age of Trump

By LAW.COM EDITORS |

Recent events in Charlottesville and the White House response have put the nation on edge and compelled leaders of U.S. businesses and law firms to speak out. The New York Times wrote last week that we’re witnessing a “broad recasting of the voice of business in the nation’s political and social dialogue.”

Why Turning Your Back on a Growing Practice Area Is Sometimes the Right Thing To Do

By Chris Johnson |

It's always interesting when Big Law firms take opposing views on a matter of strategy, whether it's their approach to equity and compensation, or the merits of a particular practice area or geography.

Johnson & Johnson's baby powder.

Jury Awards $417M in J&J Talcum Powder Case

By Amanda Bronstad |

A jury in Los Angeles awarded $417 million to a California woman who was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2007. Jurors found 9-3 that Johnson & Johnson failed to warn that its baby powder could cause the deadly disease.

National Labor Relations Board in Washington, D.C.

Ex-NLRB Compliance Officer Pleads Guilty to Stealing $400K in Back Pay

By C. Ryan Barber |

A former National Labor Relations Board compliance official pleaded guilty Monday in Washington to charges he used his position to steal more than $400,000 in back pay that was meant for victimized employees.

Alan Braverman.

Disney GC Alan Braverman Extends His Contract

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

Braverman, who has been a regular on Corporate Counsel's annual list of best compensated GCs, has signed on at the company to July 2019.

Julie Q. Brush, Solutus Legal Search .

Making the Transition From Litigator to Transactional Lawyer

By Julie Q. Brush |

It isn't easy for a pure litigator to sell him/herself as a commercial transaction lawyer. So if you are applying for a role that seeks transaction experience, there will be some hurdles. It can be a bit easier if the commercial aspect of the role includes a few litigation components to it, but most of these types of positions do not. So as you strive to take this right turn in your career, follow the advice below to sell yourself more effectively for the job you desire.

Adopt-a-Nazi (Not Really) GoFundMe page.

Jewish Bar's 'Adopt a Nazi' Fundraiser Goes Viral

By Ross Todd |

To counter rallies scheduled for San Francisco and Berkeley next weekend, the JBASF is holding an online fundraiser for an anti-extremist nonprofit.

CrowdJustice website.

DreamHost Launches Funding Campaign for Legal Fight Against DOJ

By Ben Hancock |

The web service provider says it doesn't need the money, but wants to create an outlet for internet users alarmed by a government request for data about visitors to an anti-Trump protest site.

Was Uber's Deal With Otto Out of the Ordinary?

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

Recently released court documents reveal there were certainly quirks worth noting in the deal inked by Uber and Otto.

NFL's Cold Shoulder to Kaepernick May Leave League Out in the Cold, Legally

By Todd Cunningham |

Against a backdrop of political polarization the case of Colin Kaepernick, the ex-San Francisco 49ers quarterback who is unsigned by any NFL team, and who sat out the pregame national anthem in protest, may be a test, or a black eye, for the NFL.

Instamotor website.

Craigslist Gets $31M Judgment Against Car-Selling Website

By Ross Todd |

Craigslist Inc. on Thursday secured a $31 million stipulated judgment against a car-selling website that was scraping auto listings on craigslist.org to reach out to posters to create listings on its own commercial site.

Eric Whitaker, 10x Genomics Inc. general counsel

Genome Sequencing Equipment Company Hires Eric Whitaker as GC

By David Ruiz |

Genome sequencing equipment company 10x Genomics Inc. has hired Eric Whitaker as general counsel.

In Virtual Merger, FisherBroyles Adds More Work-From-Home IP Lawyers

By Roy Strom |

Charles Yang’s three-lawyer, cloud-based Ntellect Law found a fitting home this month when it merged with FisherBroyles, a pioneering firm that claims to be the largest in a growing crowd of virtual or cloud-based law firms.

Travis Kalanick.

Kalanick Moves to Force Benchmark's Case Seeking Board Ouster to Arbitration

By Tom McParland |

Travis Kalanick, the former CEO of Uber Technologies Inc., pushed back late Thursday against an investor's attempt to force him off the ride-hailing company's board, saying that a dispute over his control of three board seats must be settled in arbitration.

Scenes outside the perimeter of the Inauguration of President Donald Trump on Jan. 20, 2017, in Washington, D.C.

What to Watch in Government's Fight for Visitor Info on Anti-Trump Website

By Cogan Schneier |

DreamHost refuses to comply with a search warrant that requests a broad swath of information related to a website it hosts, disruptj20.org, which was used to organize protests during President Donald Trump's inauguration.

Pa. Judge Follows Suit in Ordering Google to Comply With Warrant

By Ben Hancock |

U.S. District Judge Juan Sanchez’s ruling is another rebuke of a controversial ruling by the Second Circuit last year in favor of tech companies that warrants under the Stored Communications Act cannot reach outside the United States.

Eastern District of Texas, Sam B. Hall in Marshall Texas

After 'TC Heartland,' Lawyers, Courts and Clients Race to Shape New Venue Rules

By Scott Graham and Tom McParland |

The Supreme Court set off a patent law earthquake with its venue decision TC Heartland v. Kraft Foods Group Brands. Three months later it's still unclear how far the shock waves will spread.

Judge Gary Kreep.

San Diego Judge Severely Censured by Judicial Commission

By Cheryl Miller |

California's Commission on Judicial Performance concluded Superior Court Judge Gary Kreep committed 57 acts of misconduct or improper action. The commission handed down the most severe punishment short of removal from the bench on Thursday.

Appeals Court Finds for Uber, Says App Made Service Terms Clear

By B. Colby Hamilton |

Uber made it clear that users were agreeing to terms and conditions, including the waiving of a jury trial in favor of arbitration, when they downloaded and used the app, the Second Circuit ruled Thursday.

Elaine Howle, California State Auditor

SF Judge Quizzes State Auditor in CJP Records Fight

By Cheryl Miller |

Superior Court Judge Suzanne Bolanos asks lawyers representing state Auditor Elaine Howle why she needs to see confidential documents maintained by the Commission on Judicial Performance.

State Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson

Proposed California Bill Will Explicitly Protect Women Investors From Predatory VCs

By David Ruiz |

A California State Senator wants to codify specific protections for female entrepreneurs who face sexual harassment from investors and venture capitalists.

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau building in Washington, D.C.

Nothing 'Inappropriate' to See Here. CFPB Defends Going to State Regulators As Court Stalls Subpoena

By C. Ryan Barber |

In a court filing earlier this month, pension advance provider Future Income Payments said the CFPB was demanding information from state authorities that the company provided “generally under confidentiality restrictions.”

John Derrick of the California Appellate Law Group.

It’s Official: Specious Cases May Have Merit

By John Derrick |

Review a discussion on 'Parrish, et. al. v. Latham & Watkins'. California law allows a case to be objectively specious, but nonetheless to have some merit. Hmmm.

This Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017 image shows s white supremacist carrying a NAZI flag into the entrance to Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Va. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Your Move, Trump Lawyers. The Country Is Watching

By Jenna Greene |

Big law firms, the ones billing Trump full-freight—can make moral decisions about whom they choose to represent, whose agenda they want to help advance. Their response to the violence in Charlottesville? Crickets...

A photo of Heather Heyer, who was killed during a white nationalist rally, sits on the ground at a memorial the day her life was celebrated at the Paramount Theater, Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017, in Charlottesville, Va. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Little Legal Recourse for Supremacists Booted Off Tech Platforms, Experts Say

By David Ruiz |

A small group of tech companies are legally protected, for the most part, in their decisions to kick users off their platforms for privately and publicly espousing white supremacy.

Plaintiff Firms Hit Marijuana Businesses With Prop. 65 Violation Letters

By Cheryl Miller |

Hundreds of marijuana-related businesses in California have been hit with product labeling violations since January, putting them at risk of costly litigation.

Judge William Alsup, United States District Court for the Northern District of California speaks at a remembering Supreme Court Justice William Douglas event

MoFo Lawyers May Take Stand At Waymo-Uber Trial

By Ben Hancock |

A federal judge said Wednesday he might make the firm's attorneys explain to the jury why they withheld files from an ex-Waymo engineer.

Ninth Circuit Routes Apple Store Worker Suit Over Security Screening Pay to State Supreme Court

By Ross Todd |

The Ninth Circuit asked the California Supreme Court to weigh in on whether state law requires Apple Inc. to pay workers at its retail stores for time spent waiting for security checks at the end of work shifts.

Rajesh De.

Former Top NSA Lawyer Talks Spying, Leaks and Cybersecurity in the Age of Trump

By BEN HANCOCK |

When Rajesh De was first approached about joining the National Security Agency as its general counsel, advisers warned him he might be the last person standing between a free democracy and an Orwellian surveillance program. The reality wasn’t quite so dramatic, says De, who also served in the Obama White House and is now a partner at Mayer Brown. But during his tenure, what was long known as “No Such Agency” was forced to confront just how secret it really needed to be after the leaks by Edward Snowden.

Left to right: Randy Evans and Shari Klevens, Dentons partners

Banning Personal Relationships Between Attorneys and Clients

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |

Earlier this year, the State Bar of California approved an ethics rule prohibiting sexual relations between attorneys and clients. The new rule, which carves out limited exceptions, awaits a final determination by the California Supreme Court.

Century City..Photo by Jason Doiy.11-21-05.039-2005.

Milbank Lands Latham Partner in Los Angeles

By Rebecca Cohen |

Latham & Watkins corporate partner Casey Fleck, who joined the firm in 2012 from Skadden, has left for Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy’s office in Century City, California.

Neo-Nazis, white supremecists and other alt-right factions scuffled with counter-demonstrators near Emancipation Park (Formerly

Big Law Responds to Trump's Charlottesville Protest Remarks

By Meghan Tribe |

In the days following the violent clashes between rival groups of protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, that killed a 32-year-old legal assistant, some corporate executives have openly criticized President Donald Trump for his delay in condemning white supremacists. Some Big Law leaders have reacted to the president’s response.

Sedgwick to Close DC Office as Partners Join Troutman Sanders

By Katelyn Polantz |

Sedgwick will be without an office in Washington, D.C., after its last two partners in the nation's capital, Barbara Werther and David Mancini, moved to Troutman Sanders with one associate this week.

retrieved 8/2015-   Cheryl Ann Krause, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, in Philadelphia.

Circuit Reverses Transfer of Howmedica Sales Rep Suit to California

By Charles Toutant |

The appeals court overturned an order transferring the entire case to the Northern District of California, finding the move violated the 2013 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in "Atlantic Marine Construction v. U.S. District Court."

Judge Richard Tallman, United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

With Another Ninth Circuit Opening, Trump's Influence on the Court to Grow

By Ross Todd |

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit announced Tuesday that Judge Richard Tallman will take senior status in March 2018.

U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C.

Tech Giants File Amici Brief in Supreme Court Case Over Cellphone Data

By Marcia Coyle |

In a case involving law enforcement's use of cellphone location data, Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft and other major tech companies on Tuesday told the U.S. Supreme Court that transmission to a service provider should not automatically bar protection of digital data from warrantless search and seizure.

Facebook, 1 Hacker Way

IP Veteran Allen Lo Moves From Google to Facebook

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

Lo replaces Sam O'Rourke, who left Facebook in March after a nine-year run with the company.

Spokeo website.

9th Circuit Has Another Go at 'Spokeo'—and Still Finds Standing

By Amanda Bronstad |

The plaintiffs bar snatched a victory Tuesday in a case that defense lawyers heralded as a win after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2016.

Jefferson Starship, from left in rear, Pete Sears, Paul Kantner, Grace Slick and John Barbata; front from left, David Freiberg, Marty Balin and Craig Chaquico.

Jefferson Starship Founder's Breach Suit Cleared for Takeoff

By Todd Cunningham |

Craig Chaquico, a founding member of Jefferson Starship and the only musician to perform on all 10 of their albums, on Aug. 11 won a decision from U.S. Magistrate Judge Maria-Elena James in San Francisco greenlighting what his lawyer termed his "core" claims over use of the legendary band name.

Ex-Silicon Valley CEO, Republican Lawyer Launch Missive Over Gun Rights

By Cogan Schneier |

Cooper & Kirk's Charles Cooper filed a new lawsuit this week on behalf of a convicted CEO to clarify which ex-cons should be allowed to purchase firearms.

Modern web network and internet telecommunication technology, big data storage and cloud computing computer service business concept: 3D render of the server room interior in datacenter in blue light

SF Judge Hands Google Another Loss on Foreign-Stored Data

By Ben Hancock |

U.S. District Judge Richard Seeborg affirmed an earlier ruling directing the search giant to comply with a search warrant for emails stored overseas.

Uber Settles FTC Data Security Claims

By C. Ryan Barber |

Uber agreed Tuesday to submit to regular audits of its privacy protocols to resolve Federal Trade Commission allegations that the ride-hailing platform failed to properly safeguard sensitive data and misrepresented its monitoring of employee access to consumers' personal information.

Julie Q. Brush, Solutus Legal Search .

What to Do When a Second Choice Offer Comes Through First

By Julie Q. Brush |

In an opportunity-rich environment, candidates who are actively seeking greener pastures are typically confronted with this predicament—because rarely do two horses cross the finish line at exactly the same time. Sometimes it's a situation that can be managed to a comfortable conclusion.

Microsoft's Litigation Chief Scored on Social Media, Should Other In-House Lawyers Follow Suit?

By David Ruiz |

In-house counsel would be wise to use social media to share news, experts say, but companies need a measured strategy if they want to take advantage.

In Injunction Fight, Analytics Startup Gets Access to Public LinkedIn Data

By Ross Todd |

A federal judge has barred LinkedIn Corp. from blocking access to hiQ Labs, a data analytics startup that the professional networking site accused of unlawfully accessing public profiles.

Munger Tolles & Olson to Defend Studios in MOVA Technology Lawsuit

By Todd Cunningham |

Los Angeles-based Munger, Tolles & Olson has been hired to represent the Hollywood studios and film companies behind a handful of box office blockbusters in several copyright infringement suits brought over their use of the MOVA Contour special effects system.

MDL Sought in Patent Cases in Wake of SCOTUS Decision Limiting Venue

By Amanda Bronstad |

A federal judicial panel will hear arguments next month on whether to coordinate about a dozen patent infringement lawsuits brought by the same company into multidistrict litigation, the first such request since a pivotal U.S. Supreme Court decision this year changed venue rules.

DNA Denial a Win for Lone Heir in Squabble Over Inheritance From Mexican Singer

By Todd Cunningham |

The survivors of the wildly successful Mexican singer Juan Gabriel scored a court victory when a petition seeking a DNA sample from the late singer's body was denied in a case that has been making lurid headlines in Spanish-language media and has already spawned a defamation suit.

Lawyers and Grads Plea: Lower the Bar Exam 'Cut' Score

By Cheryl Miller |

Lawyers and law school graduates pleaded with California state bar officials on Monday to support adoption of a lower passing score on the bar exam.

SoFi Website

SoFi Sued for Alleged Sexual Harassment, Improperly Handling Loans

By Stephanie Forshee |

The lawyer representing the plaintiff slammed the online lending company's culture, calling it the "Uber of fintech."

Uber Hits Road Block in 'Privilege' Defense Over Google Car Files

By Scott Graham |

U.S. Magistrate Judge Jacqueline Scott Corley has thrown a wrench into the company's plan to tell jurors that Anthony Levandowski may have had an innocent reason for downloading Google's data.

California State Attorney General Xavier Becerra and San Francisco City attorney Dennis Herrera announce the filing of a joint lawsuit against funding restrictions proposed by the Trump administration

Herrera, Becerra Team Up to Fight Federal Funding Cuts Aimed at Sanctuary Cities

By Ross Todd |

The two men held a joint press conference at San Francisco Monday to announce a pair of federal lawsuits challenging special conditions the U.S. Department of Justice placed on a federal grant program.

Grant & Eisenhofer. Courtesy photo

Grant & Eisenhofer Suit Alleges Former Lawyer Stole Lucrative Whistleblower Case

By Scott Flaherty |

Grant & Eisenhofer has sued a former whistleblower client and two other law firms, alleging the whistleblower and her current lawyers conspired to strip Grant & Eisenhofer of its fee on a $280 million settlement.

Santa Clara Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky.

Court Ices Persky Recall Effort

By Cheryl Miller |

A retired judge temporarily blocked the gathering of signatures to force a vote on the Santa Clara judge who drew fire for leniency in Stanford swimmer's sexual assault case.

U.S. District Judge William Alsup, Northern District of California

Alsup Likely to Remain in Driver's Seat in Uber Trade Secrets Case

By Scott Graham |

Federal Circuit judges show little interest in steering dispute into arbitration.

Travis Kalanick, former CEO and co-founder of Uber Technologies Inc.

Uber Investor Looks to Bench Kalanick in Fight to Name CEO

By Tom McParland |

When Benchmark Capital Partners sued the former CEO of Uber Technologies Inc. in Delaware Court of Chancery Thursday, the message was clear: One of the ride-hailing innovator's most powerful investors wants Travis Kalanick off the company's board.

Goodwin Procter Picks Up Cooley Investment Funds Pro

By Rebecca Cohen |

Goodwin Procter has hired Cooley private investment funds partner Ian O'Donnell in San Francisco. The two firms have been busy this year poaching talent—sometimes from one another—for their private equity and technology groups.

Steptoe & Johnson offices in Washington, D.C. June 12, 2015. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Steptoe Strikes Back in Gender Bias Suit Filed by Ex-Associate

By Scott Flaherty |

Firing back at gender bias allegations filed by a former associate, Steptoe & Johnson forcefully denied Thursday that it has a pay disparity between women and men and urged a Los Angeles federal judge to send a suit against the firm to arbitration.

Todd Hughes.

No Right to Jury Trial on Patent Fee Shifting, Federal Circuit Rules

By Scott Graham |

The appeals court affirmed attorney fee awards totaling $12 million in a pair of cases involving Alzheimer's disease research.

Bad-times

Big Law Firms Are 'Poorly Run Businesses,' Says Ex-Heavy Hitter

By Roy Strom |

William Glasgow helped intellectual property boutique Fish & Neave merge with Ropes & Gray a dozen years ago. Now, as the Am Law 100 firm unwinds part of that union, the semi-retired Glasgow reflects on the current state of Big Law. Oh, and he once tried to do business with President Donald Trump.

Travis Kalanick, former CEO and co-founder of Uber Technologies Inc.

Investors Sue to Boot Kalanick From Uber Board

By Tom McParland |

Benchmark Capital Partners on Thursday filed suit in the Delaware Court of Chancery to remove Travis Kalanick, the former CEO of Uber Technologies Inc., from the company’s board.

John Chiang, California treasurer

Banking Experts: State-Operated Bank to Serve Marijuana Industry May Not Work

By Cheryl Miller |

Launching a state-operated bank to serve the marijuana industry may not be a viable solution, banking experts warned California leaders Thursday at a meeting in Los Angeles.

Google, Mountain View

First District Judge Rules Against Google on Overseas Data

By Ben Hancock |

Chief Judge Beryl Howell of the District of Columbia has become the first Article III judge to order Google to comply with a warrant for emails stored abroad, rejecting a landmark appeals court decision from last year.

Disability Advocates See Danger in Rejection of Real Estate Class Action

By Amanda Bronstad |

A federal appeals court has upheld denial of class certification in a case that disability advocates claim could make it more difficult to bring class actions over civil rights violations. The case is one of several in which Denver-based Civil Rights Education and Enforcement Center has sued real estate investment trusts over Americans with Disabilities Act violations. The defendant, a REIT called Hospitality Properties Trust, owns about 300 hotels under various names, including Hyatt and Country Inn & Suites. Of those, 142 provided shuttle services but not to those who use wheelchairs or scooters to get around, according to the suit, brought by three individuals.

Judge Thelton Henderson receives the 2013 Thurgood Marshall Award from the American Bar Association on Saturday, August 10th at the Westin St. Francisco Hotel in San Francisco. ..

Henderson, Set to Retire Friday, Reflects on Big Cases and the Future

By Ross Todd |

U.S. District Judge Thelton Henderson, who is set to retire on Friday, gradually has been handing off his long-running "institutional" cases in anticipation.

PARIS, FRANCE - JULY 13, 2017 : The President of United States of America Donald Trump at the Elysee Palace for an extended interview with the french President.

First Amendment Coalition's Snyder Wary Media Could Be Targeted by Espionage Act

By Todd Cunningham |

Attorney David Snyder, executive director of the First Amendment Coalition, has been particularly busy since U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced on Aug. 4 that the Department of Justice would be stepping up its enforcement and prosecution of laws against leaks and could expand the number and scope of subpoenas for journalists. But Snyder wasn't surprised by it. As a matter of fact, he predicted nearly all of it in a Jan. 4 blog titled "Leaks in the Age of Trump – The Coming Flood."

Angelina Jolie Pitt and Brad Pitt with their children in 2011.

Jolie, Pitt Wise to Keep Quiet, Celebrity Family Lawyer Says

By Todd Cunningham |

As reports surfaced Thursday that Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie have placed their divorce on hold and are working toward a reconciliation, neither actor/filmmaker issued a statement, but that hasn't kept celebrity media outlets from exulting, hand-wringing, worrying about the kids or doling out blame for everything. So what's behind the flurry of reconciliation reports, and the lack of clarity given the silence of the principals, on the status of the divorce that would end the 12-year marriage of what was Hollywood's highest-profile couple? "I think there are three likely explanations," said Stacy Phillips of Blank Rome, one of the top family law attorneys in the nation, who has worked on cases involving Britney Spears, Axl Rose, Bobby Brown and Whitney Houston, among others.

Leondra Kruger

Court Frees Latham Lawyer From Malicious-Prosecution Case

By Michael Booth |

The California Supreme Court on Thursday delivered a significant victory to lawyers fighting malicious-prosecution claims, ruling that defeating summary judgment in the underlying case bars future claims that they knowingly pursued meritless lawsuits.

Apttus hired Margo Smith as chief legal officer.

Apttus Hires Former Marketo GC Margo Smith as Chief Legal Officer

By David Ruiz |

The "quote to cash" company has hired the longtime technology GC as its chief legal officer.

Business woman jigsaw puzzle

Google Memo Sparks Questions about Legal Technology’s Gender Gap

By Gabrielle Orum Hernández |

Women in the industry reflect on gender issues following a controversial and widely circulated memo from a Google employee questioning women’s capacity for success in tech.

Insurer That Initially Denied Lyft Driver’s Claim, But Ultimately Paid It, Defeats Driver’s Lawsuit

By Steven A. Meyerowitz, Esq., Director, FC&S Legal |

A federal district court in Washington has dismissed a Lyft driver’s lawsuit against his personal automobile insurer, finding that the insurer’s initial denial of his claim had been reasonable.

Elizabeth Rindskopf Parker, executive director of the State Bar of California.

Rindskopf Parker to Resign from State Bar

By Cheryl Miller |

Elizabeth Rindskopf Parker, executive director of the California State Bar, has announced her intent to resign from the post effective September 7.

Thomas Loran III, left, and Sydney Ward, right, of Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman.

Pillsbury Clinches Pro Bono Settlement for Solano County Drivers

By Rebecca Cohen |

Drivers in Solano County who can’t pay their traffic fines will be less likely to have their licenses suspended, thanks to a settlement in a pro bono suit filed by Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman and several legal service organizations.

Facebook Wins ‘Right of Publicity’ Case Against Country-Rap Singer

By Ben Hancock |

The unanimous ruling by a California appeals court reverses a decision critics had said undermined the ad-supported economic model of a whole host of internet companies.

5 Tips to Avoid the In-House Expert Trap in the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure

By Michael Romey and Monica Klosterman |

Consider five practice tips for navigating FRCP Rule 26.

Judge Jacqueline Scott Corley, Northern District of California

Judge Blasts Uber's 'Jaw-Dropping' Waiver of In-House Privilege in Waymo Feud

By Scott Graham |

U.S. Magistrate Judge Jacqueline Corley said Uber's selective waiver of attorney-client privilege for meetings involving Travis Kalanick and Uber litigation chief Angela Padilla was self-serving and implausible.

Orrick

'Pooley & Oliver' Reunites at Orrick

By Rebecca Cohen |

Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe has hired intellectual property litigator L. Scott Oliver as a partner in the firm’s Silicon Valley office. Oliver, who represented a music publisher in the 2000 suit that led to Napster's collapse, was most recently a partner at K&L Gates.

Altshuler Firm Gears Up for Gender Pay Class Action Against Google

By David Ruiz |

The San Francisco plaintiffs firm is gathering kindling for a potential class action against Google, with dozens of current and former female employees claiming their male counterparts made more money.

Google offices in Santa Clara, California

Google Engineer Firing: 'No-Brainer' or More Complicated?

By Sue Reisinger |

James Damore's dismissal raises questions about how to handle workers who make controversial statements.

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau building in Washington, D.C.

The CFPB Is Losing a Trial Court Ally in the US Justice Department

By C. Ryan Barber |

The move away from CFPB cases comes months after the Justice Department, under Attorney General Jeff Sessions, said it would no longer defend the lawfulness of the CFPB’s independent, single-director design.

Facebook, 1 Hacker Way

Despite Objections, Facebook Message-Scanning Settlement Approved

By Ross Todd |

A federal judge in Oakland approved the settlement Facebook reached in a case accusing it of inappropriately scanning users' private messages, despite the concerns of a class action watchdog group.

Letter to the Editor: The Fight for Gender Equality Continues

The notion that there is gender parity in the legal profession is nothing short of asinine, writes RockTape Inc. GC Vitaly Gashpar.

On the Move: Tracking the Ins and Outs of California Lawyers

By Suzanne Tullo |

New hires, promotions, appointments and awards in-house, at firms and in government and academia.

Denton partners Randy Evans and Shari Klevens

Successfully Navigating Lateral Hiring

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |

Lateral hiring is a necessary part of the changing legal landscape, and it can yield mutually beneficial results for both attorney and law firm. For the attorney, a lateral move can improve advancement possibilities, while also potentially providing a greater platform for clients, different work-life balance and better compensation. For the law firm, lateral additions can increase revenue, expand or deepen the bench in certain practice areas and achieve growth objectives.

David Howard, deputy general counsel of Microsoft Corp.

Jittery Firms Put On Brave Face as Microsoft Targets Billable Hour

By Miriam Rozen |

When it comes to moving aggressively to fixed fees, the firms on Microsoft's new "strategic partners" list may serve as canaries in the coal mine.

Letter to the Editor: The 'Romantic Paternalism' of Women Leaders Awards

To be placed on a gender-based list in 21st century California, where law schools enroll more women than men, is akin to being placed in the 'special education curriculum for attorneys,' writes Al Rava.

Bruce Sewell.

Bay Area GCs Aren't Highest Paid, But Don't Feel Too Sorry for Them

By David Ruiz |

According to a recent compensation survey of GCs in the United States, Bay Area GCs are not among the highest paid, but they are far from the bottom.

Richard H. Chambers United States Court of Appeals Building in Pasadena, California.

Ninth Circuit Orders New Trial in SoCal Water Pollution Case

By Michael Booth |

The Ninth Circuit ordered a new trial in a case brought by the city of Pomona seeking at least $32 million in damages against SQM North America Corp., for allegedly contributing to the contamination of its groundwater.

Affordable Care Act.

Judge Backs Health Insurer Molina in $52M ACA Suit, but It's Not the End

By Kristen Rasmussen |

Although a federal claims court judge ruled last week that Molina Healthcare Inc. is owed more than $52 million under the risk corridor program, that's not the end of the matter, the company's lead attorney says.

Travis Kalanick, CEO and co-founder of Uber Technologies Inc.

Uber's Former CEO's Deposition Shows In-House Lawyers' Involvement in Waymo Battle

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

Travis Kalanick's deposition contains some insight into how Uber's in-house lawyers have been involved in the company's legal fight with Waymo.

Warner Bros. office in Italy.

With Stallone, Attorney Slugging Away, Things Could Get Rocky for Warner Bros.

By Todd Cunningham |

Warner Bros. may have unintentionally given Sylvester Stallone a "long count," and the actor known for his iconic "Rocky" role and veteran attorney Neville Johnson could make them pay a hefty price.

Chiangmai, Thailand, - July 21, 2017 : hand holding iPhone6s and using Uber app on road with car, Uber is smartphone app based transportation network

Judge Greenlights $32.5M Settlement Over Uber 'Safe Rides' Fee

By Ben Hancock |

U.S. District Judge Jon Tigar in San Francisco waved through the deal after attorneys fixed "deficiencies" in an earlier $28.5 million settlement.

Julie Q. Brush, Solutus Legal Search .

What to Do When Life's Not Fair: Professional Edition

By Julie Q. Brush |

Not everything in life is going to go our way. And we will undoubtedly encounter professional situations where we feel a result is outrageously wrong. But what we can do is place ourselves in a position to minimize those situations and create new ones where the next time we can prevail based on virtue and merit.

Judge Signs Off on Google's $22.5M Settlement in AdWords Class Action

By Ross Todd |

U.S. District Judge Edward Davila approved the deal in the long-running case accusing Google of overcharging for ads placed on error pages and parked domains.

Todd Hughes.

Federal Circuit Weighs $1.4M Fee Award in the Original 'Octane Fitness' Case

By Scott Graham |

Three years after the U.S. Supreme Court eased the standard for awarding “exceptional case” attorney fees in patent litigation, the parties in that case are still fighting about—and incurring—fees.

David Howard, deputy general counsel of Microsoft Corp.

Microsoft Deputy GC: In New Outside Counsel Program, AFAs Plus Competition Equals Success

By David Ruiz |

Microsoft has introduced a revamped preferred partner program that focuses on rate structures, diversity and competition.

Mixing Law Firm Business and Politics? There's a $10K Fine For That.

By Cheryl Miller |

How a state agency came to fine the former Los Angeles corporate boutique Richardson Patel—a reminder to other lawyers of the dangers of mixing business and politics.

The New Regulator to Watch? Your State AG

By Daniel R. Suvor |

In recent months, there's been steady drumbeat of news from state capitals across the country as state attorneys general take on an ever-increasing role in consumer protection, often banding together to form multistate committees that investigate and punish wrongdoing.

Panel Upholds $42M Judgment Against Safeway for Online Markups

By Ross Todd |

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit upheld a ruling that supported customers' reading of an ambiguously worded product pricing clause in an agreement governing online grocery sales.

U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington D.C.

Podcast Concept Isn't Patentable, Court Rules

By Scott Graham |

The Electronic Frontier Foundation scored a win Monday in its assault on a patent that claimed to cover the very idea of a podcast.

Wells Fargo

Wells Fargo's Whistleblower Problem Could Grow Substantially

By C. Ryan Barber |

Two weeks after being ordered to reinstate a branch manager fired for raising concerns about improper sales practices, Wells Fargo & Co. has acknowledged it could have a much larger whistleblower problem in the aftermath of a $185 million settlement with federal regulators and Los Angeles last year over allegations the bank opened up to 2.1 million unauthorized accounts.

Google Ventures General Counsel Joins New VC Firm Section 32

By David Ruiz |

Former Google Ventures GC Jennifer Kercher is following Google Ventures CEO Bill Maris to Section 32.

U.S. District Judge Thelton Henderson, Northern District of California

Near Retirement, Judge Thelton Henderson Chafes at 'So-Called Judge' Label

By Ross Todd |

U.S. District Judge Thelton Henderson says his last “official” day on the bench will be Friday, Aug. 11.

Justice William Bedsworth, California Court of Appeals for the Fourth District

Bedsworth: Pot of Gold Redefined in Nevada

By William W. Bedsworth |

As the great Arlo Guthrie once said: "There's two ways of looking at the drug problem: There's them that say there's too much drugs and them that say what there is ain't good enough."

Disney, App Partners Hit With Suit Under Child Privacy Law

By Ross Todd |

The Walt Disney Co. has been hit with a class action claiming that one of its apps targeted to youngsters violates a federal law designed to protect children's privacy while they're connected to the internet.

Commercial Suits Slip, but Greenberg Traurig Stays Busy

By Ben Hancock |

There has been a steady decline in contract and business tort cases since the economic crisis in 2009. But there's still plenty of litigation and some firms have kept busy by representing both plaintiffs and defendants.

On the Move: Tracking the Ins and Outs of California Lawyers

By Suzanne Tullo |

New hires, promotions, appointments and awards in-house, at firms and in government and academia.

Self-portrait of a female Celebes crested macaque (Macaca nigra) in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, who had picked up photographer David Slater's camera and photographed herself with it.

Monkey See, Monkey Settle: Deal in the Works to Resolve Famous Selfie Case

By Scott Graham |

A new monkey may have to bring a test case to get a definitive answer on whether animals can be "authors" under copyright law. Naruto, the crested macaque from Indonesia, is talking settlement.

Theranos Headquarters.

Theranos, Walgreens Ask Judge to Dismiss $140M Lawsuit

By Tom McParland |

Walgreen Co. and Theranos Inc. on Friday asked a federal judge in Delaware to dismiss a $140 million lawsuit claiming that the Palo Alto-based startup had breached the companies' contract and mislead the drugstore chain about its ability to deliver on its fundamental promise.

Recent Rulings on California Anti-SLAPP Motions By Entertainment Attorneys

By Stan Soocher |

Defendants in entertainment industry cases often invoke California's "anti-SLAPP" statute, Calif. Civ. Code §425.16, which is meant to bar lawsuits filed to muffle free speech activities or a legal right to petition. This summer, some noteworthy court decisions have come out of California that involved anti-SLAPP motions filed by attorneys who are defendants themselves in entertainment litigations.

David Gindler, Irell & Manella partner

Irell Avoids Shock Verdict in Defibrillator Patent Case

By Scott Graham |

Normally, a $10 million verdict is nothing to crow about. But Irell partner David Gindler called it an "amazing outcome" for his client considering Dutch electronics corporation Koninklijke Philips N.V. was seeking $217 million.

Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman's Washington, D.C. offices at 1200 17th St. NW.

Bay Area Boutique to Close After Pillsbury Picks Up Trial Lawyer

By Rebecca Cohen |

Keller Sloan Roman, a San Francisco-based litigation boutique founded in 1998, is poised to close its doors as managing partner Kenneth Keller joins Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman.

Family of Artist Killed With Gun Stolen From ICE Sues Feds

By Ross Todd |

Lawyers at Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy have sued the federal government on behalf of the family of Antonio "Tony" Ramos, 27, who was gunned down in 2015 while working on an anti-violence mural.

Latham & Watkins offices in Washington, D.C.

Litigation Finance: The New Big Law Exit?

By Ben Hancock |

The burgeoning litigation finance industry is drawing Big Law defectors in droves.

Jackson Lewis Welcomes Workplace Law Partner in San Francisco

By Rebecca Cohen |

D'Anne Gleicher, who started Alameda, California-based Wise Gleicher in 2006, has left her own firm to join labor and employment giant Jackson Lewis as a partner in San Francisco.

A 3-Step Guide to Selecting Apps for Transactional Legal Services

By Benjamin Whetsell, Paper Software |

While we wait for AI technology to catch up on contracts, here are three things to look for in apps for contract drafting and review.

Group of happy business people in a meeting at office

Hit or Miss: The Associate Salary Hike, One Year Later

By Katelyn Polantz |

Will law firms look at 2016's salary hikes as a blip or a tidal wave they couldn't stop?

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra

DC Circuit Twice Says Democratic State AGs Can Fight Trump

By Cogan Schneier |

Democratic state attorneys general scored two wins in D.C. Circuit Court in 24 hours allowing them to defend Obama-era health care and environment policies under threat from Republicans and the Trump administration.

Ron Wyden.

Will New Senate Bill Really Break the Internet?

By Ben Hancock |

Internet companies and their allies are up in arms over the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act. But is it really a "wrecking ball" for the open web?

McGuireWoods' Latest Lateral Recruit a DLA Piper Driverless Pro

By Rebecca Cohen |

Elliot Katz, a former global co-chair of the connected and self-driving car practice at DLA Piper, has joined McGuireWoods' new Bay Area base as a partner.

Google offices in Santa Clara, California

Google's Flash of Vulnerability Gives News Publishers Reason for Hope

By Todd Cunningham |

Reversals for Google in the European Union and Canada could provide a ray of hope for newspaper publishers hoping to secure an antitrust exemption in order to form a united front in negotiating with Google and Facebook.

Amazon campus.

Inside Amazon's Legal Department With GC David Zapolsky

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

Zapolsky opened up in a wide-ranging interview about what it's like running a legal department of more than 800 at one of the world's most powerful companies.

By the Department of Culture Media and Sport

Behind the Bid: How Lawyers Brought Olympics Back to LA

By Todd Cunningham |

Eleven years is a long time to wait for anything, but the legal team behind Los Angeles' bid for the 2028 Summer Games, which was blessed by the International Olympic Committee this week, has given every indication that it can go the distance.

Randy Evans and Shari Klevens, Dentons partners.

Three Thoughts in Hiring Non-Attorney Laterals

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |

Since the Great Recession, many law practices and their clients have placed a premium on working with experienced lawyers. Unsurprisingly, lateral attorney moves have increased in frequency. But lateral moves among non-attorney staff, including paralegals, executive assistants, and secretaries, have recently increased as well.

Williams & Connolly

Why It's a Good Thing That Williams & Connolly Isn't Merging With Quinn Emanuel

By Jenna Greene |

The combined firm would have been a slightly terrifying, 1,000-litigator juggernaut. But that's not why I'm glad to hear they're not merging.

Making the Most of the Role: Advice for New General Counsel

By PJ Harari |

Here are four important pieces of advice that will not only help prospective GCs prepare for the role before they ever reach the C-suite, but will also help those already in place excel in the dual role of legal adviser and business manager.

Apple and Samsung, Fighting Over New Trial, Head Back to Court

By Scott Graham |

A hearing Wednesday before U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh could resolve whether last year's U.S. Supreme Court decision means another showdown between the tech giants.

Online Sex Trafficking, Emojis, and How the Internet Has Changed Law

By BEN HANCOCK |

When Eric Goldman started practicing law, the Internet was a different place from the one we know today: a world of dial-up bulletin boards and web precursors like “Usenet” and “Gopher.” The legal aspects of cyberspace were murky at best. “I joined the Cooley Godward firm in Palo Alto in 1994 and I told them I wanted to do Internet law,” recalls Goldman, now a professor at the Santa Clara University School of Law and prominent technology law blogger. “And they said, ‘That sounds great. If we have any Internet law stuff, we’ll let you know.”

MOVA

Is Tech Mogul's Row With Movie Studios Another Waymo v. Uber?

By Scott Graham |

Silicon Valley tech entrepreneur Stephen Perlman says a former employee absconded with cutting-edge special effects technology and sold it to a rival. Sound familiar?

Attorney General Jeff Sessions testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee regarding the firing of FBI Director James Comey, and Sessions alleged meetings with Russian officials, on June 13, 2017.

Credit Unions, Banks Warily Watch Jeff Sessions on Marijuana Policy

By Cheryl Miller |

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has loomed as a threat to the legalized marijuana industry. But Sessions, at the helm of the U.S. Justice Department since February, hasn't taken any overt action to undermine state regulations, giving some hope to cannabis advocates that the longtime critic of recreational cannabis will not interfere in state schemes.

Judge Calls Uber Argument 'Counterfeit Logic' in Driver Fee Case

By Ross Todd |

A federal judge in San Francisco on Monday let a class action lawsuit move forward, allowing drivers to pursue claims the company takes an oversized chunk of passenger fees.

Williams & Connolly Denies Plans to Pursue Merger with Quinn Emanuel

By Roy Strom and Katelyn Polantz |

In any deal, the two hard-charging litigation firms would have to overcome a significant gap in profitability.

L-R Beijing China Skyline and Tokyo Japan Skyline.

Tackling Translation: Why E-discovery Tools Struggle with East Asian Languages

By Rhys Dipshan |

East Asian languages are stretching the limits of current e-discovery review tools—and fueling innovation.

Julie Q. Brush, Solutus Legal Search .

New Laws Block Job Interview Pay Questions. What If It Comes Up Anyway?

By Julie Q. Brush |

In the interview process, not all employers are in the know on the current dos and don’ts when it comes to the compensation inquiry. So what’s a candidate to do when legally prohibited from providing his/her coveted comp numbers?

Latham & Watkins

New Latham Partner Rejoins Law Firm Life After 3-Year Absence

By Rebecca Cohen |

Latham & Watkins has hired Page Mailliard as a partner in the firm's emerging companies practice, as Mailliard herself re-emerges into the practice of law after taking a step back in 2014 to nurse her mother through an illness.

Anthony Scaramucci

Scaramucci's Out of a Job. What Are His Harvard Law Classmates Up To?

By C. Ryan Barber and Cogan Schneier |

Anthony Scaramucci, the Harvard Law School graduate and now-ex White House communications director, is out of a job. As Scaramucci weighs his next moves—he was selling his SkyBridge Capital hedge fund business to join the Trump White House—he might rely on a network of plugged-in fellow Harvard alumni. Here are some notable 1989 Harvard Law grads who still have jobs.

We Asked 4 Marijuana-Industry Lawyers 4 Questions. Here's What They Said

By Cheryl Miller |

We asked four attorneys from California, Colorado, Pennsylvania and Florida for their thoughts on what’s happening now in the industry, what they’d like to see happen and what will happen five years from now.

Michael O'Sullivan.

Snap Hires Munger Tolles' Michael O'Sullivan As New GC

By David Ruiz |

The company behind Snapchat made quick work of finding a replacement for its last GC, Chris Handman.

State Bar Study Says 'Maybe' on Lower Exam Passing Score

By Karen Sloan |

Without issuing an unequivocal conclusion, the report found that the existing score of 144 is a valid standard, but that a slightly lower score of 141 would also be appropriate.

Apple iPhone 4s.

Apple Can't Knock Suit Over FaceTime Glitch on Older iPhones

By Ross Todd |

Plaintiffs claim their phones can't run the latest versions of Apple's iOS operating system and that the company intentionally disabled the FaceTime function on older versions in 2014.

Dark Web Marketplace Takedowns Mitigate Legal's Cyberthreat, But Only So Much

By Rhys Dipshan |

Law enforcement's move to shutdown dark web marketplace Alphabay helps shore up some cyberthreats, but it's benefits are likely only temporary.

IRS Lawyer Says the Agency Isn't Targeting Cannabis Lawyers

By Cheryl Miller |

A regional IRS executive told a gathering of cannabis lawyers on Friday that the agency is not out to target them, despite their work with clients whose marijuana businesses remain illegal under federal law.

With Better Pay, and Fewer Options, Associates Stay Put at Their Firms

By Christine Simmons |

Despite perennial complaints among associates about life in Big Law, rising paychecks, greater attention to associate satisfaction and a more cautious lateral market may be keeping young lawyers at their firms longer.

Dentons Nabs Large IP Team From MoFo; Group Includes 3 Partners

By Rebecca Cohen |

A team of Bay Area patent prosecutors, including three partners, has left Morrison & Foerster for Dentons.

Donald Verrilli, left, and Laurence Tribe

Constitutional Heavyweights Spar in Public LinkedIn Data Fight

By Ross Todd |

Munger, Tolles & Olson partner Donald Verrilli and Harvard Law School professor Laurence Tribe squared off in a bet-the-company battle pitting the professional networking site against data analytics startup hiQ Labs.

Judge Presses Pause On Spotify Auto-Charge Class Action

By Ben Hancock |

Spotify was sued for charging people for premium accounts they didn't want or use. There's just one problem: The lead plaintiff used his to stream more than 1,000 songs.

Introducing the 2017 Women Leaders in Tech Law

By Recorder Staff |

The Recorder is delighted to announce the 2017 Women Leaders in Tech Law.

Hillary Smith, Square general counsel

In-House Counsel Profile: Square Inc.'s Hillary Smith

By David Ruiz |

Smith says she never gets bored as top lawyer at the San Francisco-based payments company.

Trade Secrets Litigation: The No-Longer-Forgotten Part of the Tech IP Arsenal

By Zach Warren |

With massive jury rewards and the DTSA encouraging federal litigation, trade secrets litigation is seeing a surge in the tech industry.

Uber offices at 1455 Market St. in San Francisco.

Would You Be Uber's Next GC? We Asked

By Stephanie Forshee, David Ruiz and Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

The troubled ride-hailing company is in need of a new general counsel.

David Gindler, Irell & Manella partner

Misconduct Findings Against Irell, Pharma Client Upheld by Federal Circuit

By Scott Graham |

An Irell team led by partners David Gindler and Jason Sheasby represented New York-based Regeneron Pharmaceuticals during district court proceedings that ended in a highly critical ruling and invalidation of a Regeneron patent.

Marijuana

As Feds Mull Pot Policy, Cannabis Lawyers Convene in Denver

By Cheryl Miller |

More than 150 attorneys, including many from the Bay Area, will be in Denver on Friday for the National Cannabis Bar Association’s first-ever Cannabis Law Institute. The two-day event at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law will put a spotlight on the business of marijuana law, a reflection of new client opportunities for firms that want a piece of the legalized recreational and medical industry.

judge with books and gavel

Sometimes It Pays (More Than the Gov) to Be a Judge

By Cheryl Miller |

California’s 1,663 trial court judges will soon take home fatter paychecks than the governor's, thanks largely to salary increases recently given to other state employees.

University of Southern California

Reports on USC Probe Spotlight Gibson Dunn Ties

By Miriam Rozen |

Experts said that while Gibson Dunn's connections to the University of Southern California don't mean it can't adequately investigate a brewing scandal there, public perception may be another matter.

Pokéstop: Judge Calls Timeout in Suit Against Pokémon Go Maker

By Ross Todd |

A judge in San Francisco has asked property owners to show why their nuisance and trespass claims against Niantic Inc. belong in federal court.

EPIPEN® (epinephrine injection, USP) Auto-Injector 0.3 mg

MDL Panel Appears Reluctant to Consolidate Cases

By Amanda Bronstad |

The U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation appeared loath to coordinate many of the cases that came up on Thursday, including one involving record requests over the enforcement of President Donald Trump's travel ban.

Theranos Headquarters

US Magistrate Greenlights Walgreens' $40M Suit Against Theranos

By Tom McParland |

A U.S. magistrate judge on Thursday said that Theranos Inc. should not be allowed to avoid an attempt by Walgreen Co. to recover $40 million it says it is owed after the embattled blood-testing company failed to deliver on its fundamental promise.

Michael Jackson performing during his 13-city U.S. tour in Kansas City, Mo. on Feb. 24, 1988.

Quincy Jones Awarded $9.4M in Royalties From Michael Jackson's Production Co

By Todd Cunningham |

Michael Jackson's MLJ Productions must pay music producer Quincy Jones $9.4 million in unpaid royalties from the soundtrack to the documentary film "This Is It" and the late pop star's Cirque du Soleil shows, a jury has ruled.

Clip from the documentary film “Munich '72 and Beyond.”

Big Law Partner Gets Emmy Nod for Munich '72 Documentary

By Todd Cunningham |

David Ulich's film chronicles the massacre of the Israeli Olympic team.

In First Calif. Talc Trial, It's the Defense Taking the Offensive

By Amanda Bronstad |

Johnson & Johnson's lawyers went on the attack Wednesday in the first California trial over talcum powder, even moving for a mistrial in the middle of opening statements.

President Donald Trump.

LGBTQ Groups Threaten to Sue Trump Over Trans Military Ban

By Cogan Schneier |

Lawyers are ready to take the president to court should Trump's tweets become reality.

Jones Day Adds L&E Partners in LA, Minneapolis

By Rebecca Cohen |

Jones Day has continued building out labor and employment bench, bringing on Winston & Strawn partner Amanda Sommerfeld in Los Angeles and Dorsey & Whitney partner Joseph Hammell in Minneapolis, where Jones Day opened an office last year. The duo are the latest laterals lured to the growing legal giant’s ranks so far this year.

Workers Are Lining Up for Microchip Implants, but Lawyers Say Slow Down

By David Ruiz |

Is microchipping your employees a good idea? Attorneys have serious reservations about the practice.

Wells Fargo

Lawyer's 'Inadvertent' E-Discovery Failures Led to Wells Fargo Data Breach

By Christine Simmons |

A massive Wells Fargo customer data breach was not the work of a hacker, but of the bank's own lawyer who failed to review an entire set of discovery documents, including information about the bank's wealthy customers, before it was shipped to a litigation adversary.

Ross Cellino Jr. and Stephen Barnes

Cellino & Barnes Breakup Gets Uglier With Poaching Claims

By Josefa Velasquez |

The dispute between the name partners of the well-known Buffalo-based personal injury firm just got nastier with state Supreme Court Justice Deborah Chimes signing a restraining order against Cellino for allegedly poaching lawyers and cases, according to an affidavit by Barnes.

Julie Q. Brush, Solutus Legal Search .

Market Compensation Range for an IP Director

By Julie Brush |

"Market" compensation for a director of IP role depends on several variables.

Lori Ajax

California's Pot Chief Says She's Not Focusing on Feds

By Cheryl Miller |

California's chief marijuana regulator conceded Wednesday that encouraging cannabis entrepreneurs to join the state's new regulated market could make them "fair game" for federal enforcers. Legalization advocates are also wary of a report, expected to be released Thursday by a Jeff Sessions-appointed task force on crime reduction, that will include a review of "charging, sentencing, and marijuana policies."

Arturo Gonzalez, Morrison Foerster.....

MoFo Gets Unwelcome Spotlight in Waymo-Uber Case

By Ben Hancock |

The deal lawyers who represented Uber in acquiring a company started by a former Waymo engineer could play a cameo role in the trade secrets trial.

Beyonce with twins Sir and Rumi in an announcment on Instagram with over 9 Million likes

Beyonce, Jay-Z Want to Trademark Twins’ Names. What Could Possibly Stand in Their Way?

By Scott Graham |

The musicians want to prevent others from profiting off their kids' names. But to be successful, trademark applicants have to have a true intent to use the mark, says Knobbe Martens partner Ian Gillies.

Apple Beats Back Class Cert in App Privacy Suit

By Ross Todd |

Judge Jon Tigar found that consumers failed to show the privacy-related marketing of Apple's mobile devices was long-running and extensive enough to support false advertising-related claims.

Travis Kalanick, Melinda Haag and Walter Brown.

Orrick Steps In for Kalanick Ahead of Waymo Deposition

By Ben Hancock |

Former U.S. Attorney Melinda Haag and Walter Brown, Orrick partners, are representing ousted Uber CEO Travis Kalanick in a lawsuit that centers on allegedly stolen driverless car technology.

Waymo driverless vehicle.

Who Will Own the Rights to Autonomous Cars?

By Van Lindberg, Dykema |

As the Supreme Court tackles key patent issues that could relate to autonomous cars, the DMCA and cybersecurity could throw a wrench in the IP engine.

Left to right: Randy Evans and Shari Klevens, Dentons partners

Issues to Consider When Asking a Partner to Leave

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |

As law firms grapple with new economic realities, it is becoming more common for firms to ask individual or groups of partners to leave in an effort to shore up the firm's finances. Not only can this decision be extremely difficult considering the firm's personal relationships with those partners, it can also involve ethical and financial risks for the firm and for the departing partner.

Andrew Dhuey, center, speaking to the media after the Naruto v. Slater hearing.

Small Practices, Big Impacts: Meet the Lawyers Behind Two Major-League IP Cases

By SCOTT GRAHAM |

Andrew Dhuey, a solo practitioner in Berkeley, California, has the kind of practice a lot of lawyers dream of. He left a Big Law job years ago but still makes it into big intellectual property showdowns year in and year out.

Chris Carr

MoFo Practice Leader Leaves for Baker Botts' Bay Area Base

By Rebecca Cohen |

Baker Botts has recruited environmental partner Christopher Carr in San Francisco from Morrison & Foerster, where he was chair of the latter's environment and energy group and co-chair of the firm's unmanned aerial systems and drone group.

Paramount's 'Genisys,' Fox's 'Deadpool' Latest Targets of Rearden Suits Over Visual FX Tech

By Todd Cunningham |

What do Arnold Schwarzenegger, the Beast of "Beauty and the Beast" fame and the raunchiest and richest movie superhero ever have in common? They're all characters in movies that are named in a growing series of recent suits filed by San Mateo visual effects firm Rearden Inc., which is owned by Silicon Valley entrepreneur Steve Perlman.

Chris Handman.

Snap's General Counsel Leaves Company

By David Ruiz |

The company behind messaging app Snapchat has lost its first-ever GC, Chris Handman.

Attorney Discipline

San Francisco Lawyer Accused of Pilfering Client Funds

By Rebecca Cohen |

The State Bar of California issued a consumer alert Monday for Dax Yeophantong Craven, a San Francisco-based entertainment lawyer that is has charged with pocketing $100,000 he was supposed to use for a real estate transaction.

HP Inc. and Hewlett Packard Enterprise logos.

HP Spinoffs Accused of Race Discrimination in Hiring, Promotions

By Ross Todd |

Two former and one current black HP employee claim they were repeatedly passed over for promotions.

Google offices in Santa Clara, California

Google Sues to Block 'Repugnant' Canadian Court Decision

By Ben Hancock |

The tech giant argues that a Canadian Supreme Court ruling affecting U.S. search results violates its rights under the First Amendment and Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act.

What GC Thought Leaders Experiment Is About (Hint: Not Cost)

By Firoz Dattu and Dan Currell, AdvanceLaw |

The leaders of AdvanceLaw explain the GC Thought Leaders Experiment is not about tracking billing data, but about tracking what makes for a satisfying relationship between law firm and client.

DNA Sequencing Patent Feud Sparks New Court Fight

By Scott Graham |

Peace broke out last week between rivals Illumina Inc. and Qiagen N.V. as the companies settled a contentious suit in California. But before lawyers could pack up their files, a new patent war was taking shape in Delaware.

Barbara Klementz

Bay Area Partner to Lead Baker McKenzie’s Golden State Operations

By Rebecca Cohen |

Baker McKenzie has appointed compensation and employment partner Barbara Klementz as its California managing partner, the firm announced Tuesday. She will oversee more than 250 lawyers across the global legal giant’s offices in Palo Alto and San Francisco.

UC Irvine School of Law.

Cyber Victims Defense Clinic to Launch at California Irvine School of Law

By Ed Silverstein |

The clinic will provide free legal and technical help to those who were victimized by cyberattacks, such as the elderly and other at-risk groups.

Bay Area Partner to Lead Baker McKenzie's Golden State Operations

By Rebecca Cohen |

Barbara Klementz, managing partner of Baker McKenzie’s offices in Palo Alto and San Francisco and a regional leader of the global legal giant’s global equity services group and compensation and employment law practice, has been named its new California managing partner.

San Francisco 49ers cheerleaders (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Cheerleaders Fail to Score With Billion-Dollar Lawsuit Against NFL

By Katheryn Hayes Tucker |

The NFL has shut down its cheerleaders' lawsuit over their skimpy paychecks.

Boring Company promotional video

Musk's Boring Company Seeks In-House Counsel

By David Ruiz |

The new in-house lawyer for Musk's underground tunneling project will likely need experience with a patchwork of municipal rules and safety regulations.

E-Discovery Company Revives Defamation Suit Over Glassdoor Posts

By Ross Todd |

The decision is a victory for ZL Technologies, a Milpitas,California-based company that provides electronic content archiving software used in eDiscovery, compliance and analytics.

Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuellar, California Supreme Court

Letter to the Editor: Don't Ignore the Risks of "Superintelligence"

By Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar |

Justice Cuéllar clarifies his views on the potential risks posed by "superintelligence" discussed in Nicholas Bostrom's influential book, "Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies."

VW Plaintiffs' Team Awarded Another $125M in Fees and Costs

By Ross Todd |

Friday's order brings tally awarded to the 22-lawyer plaintiffs' steering committee led by Elizabeth Cabraser of San Francisco's Lieff Cabraser Heimann Bernstein to nearly $350 million.

Key Hollywood Unions Choose New Leadership

By Todd Cunningham |

Two of the largest entertainment industry unions have elected three presidents, and no one had to break a sweat campaigning, since all three ran unopposed.

Jury Hands Loss to Telesocial in Trade Secrets Case Against Orange

By Ben Hancock and Scott Graham |

Defunct social media calling startup Telesocial has been dealt a loss in its federal lawsuit alleging that Orange SA, the French telecom giant, hacked into its system and stole its trade secrets.

I Fell for a Phishing Email, and the Law Couldn't Help Me

By Rhys Dipshan |

Despite regulating spam emails, the federal CAN-SPAM Act may do little to prevent phishing spam from reaching your inbox.

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau building in Washington, D.C.

Law Firm, Fighting CFPB Subpoena, Urges Court to End 'Fishing Expedition'

By C. Ryan Barber |

A California law firm on July 21 blasted a recent subpoena from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau as "nothing more than an unwarranted and impermissible fishing expedition," in a brief that also called for eliminating the agency on the grounds that its independent, single-director structure violates the Constitution.

University of California at Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.

UC Berkeley and Big Law Give Minority Entrepreneurs a Boost

By Karen Sloan |

A new program provides legal assistance to underrepresented groups seeking to launch startups.

Julie Hawkinson - Clyde & Co

Clyde & Co Opens Ninth U.S. Office with Los Angeles Launch

By James Booth |

UK insurance giant Clyde & Co is opening its ninth office in the U.S., with a launch in Los Angeles.

Uber headquarters in San Francisco

Quinn Emanuel Fired Uber, Citing Fixed Fee Rates That Aren’t ‘Financially Viable’

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

New court documents show that Quinn Emanuel dropped Uber as a client last year after finding the company's fixed fee arrangements unsatisfactory.

Legal-Departments

Call for Nominations: The Recorder's In-House Legal Departments of the Year 2017

The Recorder’s 2017 Legal Department of the Year Awards recognize the standout legal departments among emerging and large companies (annual revenue > $1 billion).

Foley & Lardner Lures IP Pros From LeClairRyan

By Rebecca Cohen |

Foley & Lardner has hired intellectual property litigators Duane Mathiowetz and Rick Chang as partners in the firm's San Francisco and Silicon Valley offices.

Bristol-Myers Squibb

SCOTUS' Game-Changing 'Bristol-Myers' Hasn't Yielded Easy Defense Wins

By Amanda Bronstad |

A U.S. Supreme Court decision widely heralded by defense attorneys as a "game-changer" hasn't exactly dealt them a slam dunk in the courts.

Mira Edelman

Mira Edelman Moves From Google to Director of E-Discovery Services at Facebook

By Zach Warren |

Before joining Facebook as director of e-discovery services, the noted e-discovery expert and speaker spent six years at Google.

Rachel Krevans.

Rachel Krevans, Pioneering Litigator and Lawyer to Apple, Dies at 60

By Rebecca Cohen |

Krevans, the former head of Morrison & Foerster’s intellectual property practice who helped lead Apple’s ferocious legal battle with Samsung over smartphone technology, died Wednesday of cancer at age 60.

DLA Piper Acquires 60-Lawyer Liner Firm in L.A.

By Roy Strom |

The deal with Liner LLP, a boutique known for representing entertainment industry clients ranging from film studios to Bill Cosby, boosts DLA Piper's presence in Southern California.

Who Says California's Bar Exam Is Too Tough?

By Cheryl Miller |

Over the last year California's bar exam has been scrutinized and vilified. But that hasn't stopped a crush of would-be Golden State lawyers from registering for the latest crucible, which starts Tuesday. Applications to take the July bay exam topped 10,000 this year—an increase over last year's numbers.

New Tactic in Climate Change Litigation Could Cost Energy Companies Billions. Or Not.

By Jenna Greene, The Litigation Daily |

There’s a lovely neighborhood in Marin County, California where we recently thought about buying a house. The lots in Bel Marin Keys aren’t big, but they back to lagoons connected to the San Pablo Bay. Just about everyone has a dock in their backyard.

Connie Brenton, NetApp and member of CLOC

CLOC: Legal Ops Leaders at the Vanguard of a Movement

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

More legal departments are seizing the opportunity to implement legal operations programs to lower spend and increase efficiency. Amid this legal ops movement, one organization, the Corporate Legal Operations Consortium, has emerged as both a catalyst for change and an ongoing example of the movement's success.

Types of College Grads Nailing the LSAT Aren't Keen on Law School

By Karen Sloan |

Call it the LSAT disconnect. Although college grads with majors in science, technology, engineering and math tend to score high on the law school entrance exam, those taking the test and applying most often have majors in the social sciences and "helping" professions that typically score lower, according to recent studies.

Paul Singh Grewal, deputy general counsel at Facebook.

Facebook Lawyer Details 'Fake News' Fight

By Ross Todd |

The social media platform is working to curb the influence of fake news articles shared by its users without shutting down speech.

President Donald Trump.

Will the DNC Hack Lawsuit Expose Trump-Russia Ties?

By BEN HANCOCK |

President Donald Trump is no stranger to lawsuits. But the latest case filed against his campaign over Russia’s hack of the Democratic National Committee is different, potentially unspooling in public view the ties between Trump, his allies and the Russian government.

UC Law Schools Win Bid to Intervene in Case Awarding $45M for Botched Mortgage

By Karen Sloan |

A bankruptcy judge has ruled that the institutions have standing in a lawsuit resulting in a large punitive damages award.

Salle Yoo, Uber

Uber, Twitter and Oracle GCs Sound Off on International Obstacles

By David Ruiz |

A panel of high-powered general counsel for Silicon Valley tech companies explained their current legal priorities in doing business all across the world.

Julie Q. Brush, Solutus Legal Search .

Looking for a Flexible Schedule? Here Are Some Ways to Do It

By Julie Brush |

Technology has enabled greater connectivity, dependability and productivity, which bode well for the alternatively scheduled lawyer. But finding these type of work dynamics can still prove challenging. So, where to look?

Betty H. Chen, Martina Tyreus Hufnal and Kelly Allenspach Del Dotto of Fish & Richardson

Practical Aftermath of 'TC Heartland': Book Your Flights for the Coasts

By Betty H. Chen, Martina Tyreus Hufnal and Kelly Allenspach Del Dotto |

Over the past three years, patent filings in the Eastern District of Texas grew steadily while patent filings in the Northern District of California and the District of Delaware dropped. In fact, in the past year, over 34 percent of the patent suits against companies located in northern California were brought in E.D. Tex. With the U.S. Supreme Court's May decision in "TC Heartland," all signs point to significant change.

President Donald Trump.

Will the DNC Hack Lawsuit Expose Trump-Russia Ties?

By BEN HANCOCK |

President Donald Trump is no stranger to lawsuits. But the latest case filed against his campaign over Russia’s hack of the Democratic National Committee is different, potentially unspooling in public view the ties between Trump, his allies and the Russian government.

Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuellar, California Supreme Court

What Worries a Calif. Supreme Court Justice About AI and the Law?

By Ben Hancock |

Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar isn't afraid of the robot uprising. But when is reliance on AI arbitrary and capricious? That's a heavy question.

U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer, Northern District of California

In 'Courthouse Bug' Case, Judge Allows in Evidence

By Ross Todd |

Defense lawyers lost out on their bid to suppress wide swaths of evidence federal agents gained after planting recording devices outside the San Mateo County courthouse in 2009 and 2010.

Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan offices in Washington, D.C. September 14, 2016. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/ALM

Ex-Secretary Accuses Quinn Emanuel of Racial Discrimination

By Roy Strom |

A former floating secretary who left the elite trial firm in 2015 claims he was subjected to racial slurs by a trial logistics director during the high-profile 2014 patent trial of Apple v. Samsung.

Shaun Jamison, Professor at Concord Law School

Top Five Legal Steps for Bicyclist Involved in a Crash

By Shaun G. Jamison |

Being in a crash is awful, but taking these five steps can help limit the damage done and overcome the obstacles to legal recovery for bicyclists.

California Supreme Court.

California Appeals Court Further Expands Reach of “Professional Services” Exclusion

By Steven A. Meyerowitz |

An appellate court in California has issued a decision in a case stemming from a massive explosion at a pipeline owned by Kinder Morgan, Inc., that further expands the reach of the “professional services” exclusion in commercial general liability (“CGL”) insurance policies.

Issues for Associates to Consider When Changing Firms=

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |
Left to right: Randy Evans and Shari Klevens, Dentons partners

Issues for Associates to Consider When Changing Firms

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |

In today's legal environment, it has become extremely unlikely that an attorney will stay at a single law firm throughout her entire career. Instead, attorneys now frequently change firms in search of better opportunities or better fits. This is especially true for associates, who may change firms multiple times early in their career before they find the right home.

Hey, California Lawyers, There Might be a Dues Bill This Year

By Cheryl Miller |

Legislation authorizing California's state bar to collect up to $390 in dues from members in 2018 passed out of a key committee Tuesday without the drama or division that has marked proceedings in recent years.

Amy Olli.

VMWare Names Amy Olli as New General Counsel

By David Ruiz |

The virtualization and cloud computing software company has hired the former Avaya GC to lead its legal department.

Berkeley Law Grad Convicted of Multimillion-Dollar Fraud in Miami

By Celia Ampel |

The former Wall Street hedge fund employee stole his ex-coworkers' identities to get fraudulent loans, according to prosecutors.

Study: Asian-Americans Face Glass Ceiling in the Law

By Ross Todd |

A study released Tuesday by NAPABA and Yale Law School found Asian-Americans, the fastest-growing minority group in the legal profession, have made only limited progress in reaching the upper echelons of the law.

Calif. Company Targets Rivals' Noncompete Agreements

By Ross Todd |

Veeva Systems Inc. has sued three rivals claiming the noncompete agreements they force employees to sign violate California laws favoring worker mobility.

Michael Moradzadeh of Rimon

Longtime Orrick IP Partner Decamps for 'Hybrid' Boutique

By Rebecca Cohen |

Rimon has reeled in Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe commercial and intellectual property litigation partner Matthew Poppe in Palo Alto, California, and San Francisco. Poppe, who spent nearly 22 years at Orrick, is now a partner at Rimon, a small firm using part of the virtual model.

Disney Sued Over Visual Effects on 'Beauty and the Beast,' 2 Marvel Blockbusters

By Todd Cunningham |

Disney has become entangled in the long-running legal battle over rights to an Oscar-winning visual effects technology, and its profits on "Beauty and the Beast," the year's top-grossing movie so far, and two other blockbusters are in potential jeopardy.

Client Call for Greater Diversity at Fever Pitch

By Lisa Kirby and Caren Ulrich Stac |

As legal departments narrow their rosters of outside counsel to shortlists of preferred providers, they have greater leverage to set more rigorous diversity and inclusion expectations.

U.S. Department of Justice seal in Main Justice press room. June 2, 2014. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

DOJ Telegraphs Top FCPA Priorities Under Trump Administration

By Melinda Haag and Betsy Popken |

Trevor McFadden, the DOJ's Acting Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General for the criminal division, may have recently telegraphed the DOJ’s top FCPA priorities under the new Trump Administration.

Associate Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch speaks during a civics program showcase at the 2017 Ninth Circuit Judicial Conference in San Francisco, Monday, July 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, Pool).

Gorsuch Gets Civics Lesson From Student Essayists at Ninth Circuit Conference

By Ross Todd |

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch got a preview of arguments he’s likely to hear next term at the high court at a forum on civics education at the Ninth Circuit’s judicial conference Monday afternoon.

AMC's

Winners, Losers From Those Nasty Court Filings in 'The Walking Dead' Case

By Todd Cunningham |

A trove of emails and financial records filed this week in the legal battle between fired "The Walking Dead" creator Frank Darabont, Creative Artists Agency and the AMC Network has provided a revealing glimpse behind the curtain of Hollywood TV production and financing. But like the malevolent, flesh-ripping zombies that populate the show, it ain't pretty.

Hand holding mobile phone with chatbot application.

The DoNotPay Dilemma: Can Chatbots Provide Access to Justice Without a Lawyer?

By Gabrielle Orum Hernández |

The ticket-challenging chatbot has expanded into 1,000 areas of law, across all 50 states, but questions loom around providing legal services without attorneys.

Napa Judge, Accused of Stealing Social Club's Card Holders, Will Resign

By Cheryl Miller |

A Napa County judge will resign at the end of the year under terms of an agreement reached with state disciplinarians who accused him of stealing, and later returning, two pricey business-card holders from a San Francisco social club. The judge, Michael Williams, was already planning to retire, and the agreement with the commission "allowed him to bring closure to the event," said the judge's attorney.

U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

Appeals Court Rules for FBI on Surveillance Gag Orders

By Ben Hancock |

In a setback for internet and telecom providers, a federal appeals court on Monday ruled that provisions in the Electronic Communications Privacy Act barring companies from disclosing government surveillance requests do not violate the First Amendment.

Google headquarters in Mountain View, California.

Google Scores in Data Battle With Labor Department

By David Ruiz |

An administrative law judge prevented the Department of Labor from gaining access to reams of data it requested from Google as part of an external government audit.

Donald Trump

Trump Legal Team Fires Back at Plaintiff Seeking to Unravel Trump U Settlement

By Amanda Bronstad |

President Donald Trump in court papers has accused a lawyer and nearly two dozen law professors of lodging "inflammatory, gratuitous, and untested facts and assertions" in their objections over his $25 million Trump University settlement.

Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch walks down the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court after his Investiture ceremony on June 15, 2017.

Gorsuch to Speak at 9th Circuit Conference After Kennedy's Wife Is Injured

By Tony Mauro |

New U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch will make one of his first off-bench public appearances July 17 at the judicial conference of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in San Francisco. Mary Kennedy, who fractured her hip in a fall, is expected to make a full recovery.

To Depose a CLO: A Tricky Situation for Uber's Lawyers

By David Ruiz |

Deposing an in-house counsel means wading through question after question about privileged information, said several trial attorneys.

Tweeting From the Bench: Judges Discuss Social Media Pitfalls

By Ross Todd |

In the wake of the first federal appellate court decision tackling a judge's tweets, judicial Twitter users discuss precautions to avoid the appearance of bias.

Michael Colantuono

New CA Bar President Vows to Burnish Agency's Image

By Cheryl Miller |

Michael Colantuono, a municipal law attorney from Grass Valley, was elected president of the State Bar of California on Friday, making him the first openly gay president of the organization. He'll be sworn in to office this fall.

ZombieGoBoom.

Zombie 'Adpocalypse': YouTube Hit With Filmmaker Suit Over Ad Changes

By Ross Todd |

The producers behind the YouTube channel "Zombiegoboom" are suing Google Inc. claiming that recent changes in the way ads are placed on streaming videos have unfairly affected them and others who rely on YouTube ad revenues for income.

How Paul Sieminski of WordPress Takes On the Challenges of Protecting User Data

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

Sieminski's company recently got a high rating from the Electronic Frontier Foundation on protection of user data.

Serranus Clinton Hastings

Racist Pasts of Boalt Hall and Hastings' Namesakes Haunt Law Schools

By Karen Sloan |

One man advocated for barring Chinese immigrants; another apparently enjoyed an abhorrent pastime.

Left to right: Mark O’Sullivan, West Coast Head Partner; Anne-Marie Bohan, Head of Technology and Innovation; Chris Bollard, Partner, Technology and Innovation; Michael Jackson, Managing Partner; Emma Doherty, Partner, International Business Group; Robert O’Shea, Head of the Corporate and Commercial Department

Ireland's Matheson Opens Office in San Francisco; Firm's Third Office in US

By Rebecca Cohen |

The Dublin-based law firm is bringing on technology and privacy partner Chris Bollard from Arthur Cox to co-manage the new office with partner Mark O'Sullivan.

Marc Kasowitz

Kasowitz Apologizes for Emails as Partner Describes Firm 'Under Siege'

By Katelyn Polantz and David Bario |

After telling a critic to "Watch your back, bitch," in a series of profanity-laden emails, Marc Kasowitz said it was "one of those times where one wishes he could reverse the clock."

Cooley Takes Wilson Sonsini Partners in Major Tech Business Grab

By Christine Simmons |

In a significant acquisition of corporate tech attorneys, Cooley has hired four partners in New York and Washington, D.C., from rival Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati. Cooley also has plans to hire up to 20 more lawyers to support their business, which could generate millions for the firm.

Why Some California Counties Are Saying No to Commercial Cannabis

By Cheryl Miller |

Voters overwhelmingly said yes to to recreational use. But not every city and county rushed to embrace the green wave. Here are five of the top reasons lawyers and local government officials gave for their hesitation.

Airbnb Host Fined for Cancelling Law Student's Reservation Based on Race

By Cheryl Miller |

An Airbnb host who refused to rent her Southern California house to a woman because she is Asian will pay $5,000 in damages and take a college-level course in Asian-American studies, the state Department of Fair Employment and Housing said Thursday in announcing the agreement.

DARTMOUTH, CANADA - JUNE 10, 2017: Marshalls is an American chain of department stores owned by TJX. Marshalls has more than 750 stores in The United States and Canada.

Calif. Supreme Court Gives Worker PAGA Suits More Oomph

By Ben Hancock |

In a ruling against retail chain Marshalls, the California Supreme Court said plaintiffs suing under the state's Private Attorneys General Act have broad discovery rights early in the litigation.

U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

In Sierra Pacific Appeal, 'Cautionary Tale' for Tweeting Judges

By Ross Todd |

In what it termed a "cautionary tale" about judges posting on social media about pending cases, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on Thursday turned back a bid by Sierra Pacific Industries Inc. to unwind a $122 million deal the timber giant reached to settle federal claims that it was liable for the 2007 Moonlight Fire, a blaze that consumed nearly 65,000 acres in the Plumas National Forest.

Self-portrait of a female Celebes crested macaque (Macaca nigra) in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, who had picked up photographer David Slater's camera and photographed herself with it.

End of the Line for the 'Monkey Selfie' Case?

By Scott Graham |

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit seemed skeptical of arguments from Irell & Manella partner David Schwartz that a crested macaque could be an “author” within the meaning of the Copyright Act.

High-Profile Team Sues Trump Campaign, Alleging Role in DNC Hack

By Cogan Schneier |

A group of prominent lawyers is behind a new lawsuit filed Wednesday on behalf of Democratic donors against President Donald Trump and Roger Stone, who has advised Trump in an informal capacity.

Morrison & Foerster admitted it accidentally retained files from Anthony Levandowski, pictured, who formerly headed Uber's driverless car division.

In Waymo Case, MoFo Reveals It Still Has Files From Former Uber Engineer

By Ben Hancock |

The firm revealed in a filing Wednesday that it accidentally kept copies of some documents from Anthony Levandowski, who is accused of stealing over 14,000 files from Google's self-driving car division.

Gillette razors

Are Law Firms Too Sophisticated for Their Own Good?

By Hugh A. Simons |

The dangerous path Big Law is headed down and what it has to do to change course.

Schuyler Moore

'Sky' Moore Joins Greenberg Glusker as Partner After 25 Years With Stroock

By Todd Cunningham |

Prominent entertainment attorney Schuyler "Sky" M. Moore has joined Greenberg Glusker as a partner in its entertainment practice.

GC Data Sharing Plan Is 'Wake-Up Call' for Law Firms

By Roy Strom |

With an interest in pleasing clients, law firm leaders mostly voiced enthusiasm for a plan by 25 GCs to share data on how they’ve performed. But they realize it could create winners and losers.

Mortgage fraud concept

Ex-Lawyer Sentenced to 41-Month Prison Term in Boiler-Room Mortgage Scheme

By Ross Todd |

A former lawyer in Long Beach has been sentenced to 41 months in prison for his roles in a mortgage modification scheme which posed as a successful law firm.

Delianne Koops, pastor at the First Presbyterian Church of Berkeley.

Group Offers $100,000 Reward for Information Leading to Arrest of Kilpatrick Attorney's Killer

By Rebecca Cohen |

Friends and family of murdered attorney James Gilliland said Wednesday they will offer a $100,00 reward for tips that lead to the arrest and conviction of his killer.

An Open Letter From 25 General Counsel

Announcing a real-time exercise to test industry assumptions and understand how to improve the legal market and relationships between law firms and clients.

The GC Thought Leaders Experiment

By Firoz Dattu & Dan Currell, AdvanceLaw |

Whether we’re talking lawyers or married couples, some relationships manage to stay strong over the long run. What’s the secret? The GC Thought Leaders Experiment tackles that question.

Facebook, Shutting Down Pot Pages, Still Won't Like Marijuana

By Cheryl Miller |

Facebook Inc. has taken down the pages of marijuana businesses operating legally in Alaska, continuing a practice that has targeted dispensaries in California, Arizona, Colorado and New Jersey.

Law Firm Leaders' Confidence Grows Despite Demand Jitters

By Roy Strom |

A Citi Private Bank survey of managing partners’ confidence in the second half of 2017 shows they are more bullish on demand, despite meager growth in the first quarter.

Ballard Spahr offices in Washington, D.C. March 24, 2015. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Ballard Spahr Closes San Diego Office

By Lizzy McLellan |

Ballard Spahr has closed its office in San Diego, the firm confirmed Tuesday, after losing two partners to Dinsmore & Shohl, and transferring other lawyers to its Los Angeles office.

Randy Evans and Shari Klevens, Dentons partners.

Consider Retaining Outside Counsel to Defend Against Motions to Disqualify

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |

No matter how many precautions are taken, most law firms inevitably face a motion to disqualify at some point, particularly with regard to lateral hires while a case is ongoing. Even if the motion is completely meritless, law firms should take every motion to disqualify seriously given the potential risks to the law firm. Indeed, law firms may find that retaining outside counsel is preferable to going it alone when defending a motion to disqualify.

Lawsuit Over Authorship of Disney's 'Zootopia' Dealt Setback for Now

By Todd Cunningham |

Disney has prevailed, at least for the moment, in a copyright complaint targeting its animated box-office hit "Zootopia."

NJ Says No: Court Decision Renews Online Legal Services Debate

By Gabrielle Orum Hernández |

A recent decision from three New Jersey Supreme Court committees raised concerns over legal service plans from Avvo, LegalZoom and Rocket Lawyer.

This photo provided by Jake Strang shows tents and a portable toilet set up for attendees for the Fyre Festival, Friday, April 28, 2017 in the Exuma islands, Bahamas. Organizers of the much-hyped music festival in the Bahamas canceled the weekend event at the last minute Friday after many people had already arrived and spent thousands of dollars on tickets and travel. A statement cited

Damages May Be Sought From Investors in Abortive Fyre Festival

By Todd Cunningham |

With the finances of disgraced Fyre Festival concert promoter Billy McFarland very much in question, major investors in the concert-turned-fiasco are facing unexpected scrutiny and potential liability for the money lost.

Kristin Sverchek, Lyft general counsel

Lyft GC Kristin Sverchek Weighs Gig Economy's Future

By Erin Mulvaney |

Lyft general counsel Kristin Sverchek offers her perspective on the future of the on-demand employment sector, and offers advice to up-and-coming companies that might not find themselves fitting exactly into the existing labor structure.

Left to right: Steptoe partners Bill Abrams, Laurie Edelstein and Sanjeet Dutta in Steptoe's San Francisco office

Steptoe Moving Bay Area Office to San Francisco

By Rebecca Cohen |

Three years after Steptoe & Johnson's arrival in the Bay Area, the firm has relocated all 10 attorneys from its Palo Alto office to 1 Market St. in downtown San Francisco.

Julie Q. Brush, Solutus Legal Search .

Facing a Career Log Jam, Should You Leave a Job You Love?

By Julie Brush |

When an employer "announces" that career advancement in the organization will be nonexistent for the foreseeable future, it can be a bit jolting as well as confusing. And sometimes it's hard to make sense of what it really means. Is it true? How serious is it?

Daralyn Durie of Durie Tangri, who is representing Orange SA in a trade secrets case brought by Telesocial Inc.

After Delay, Trade Secrets Trial Against Orange Gets Under Way

By Ben Hancock |

Embattled San Francisco startup Telesocial Inc. claims the French telecom giant hacked into its servers and stole its technology to develop a social media calling service.

Google Wins Round Against Intellectual Ventures in Touch-Screen Patent Fight

By Scott Graham |

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit refused to affirm a decision from the Patent Trial and Appeal Board that sided with IV.

Sidley Austin offices in Washington, D.C.

Sidley Austin Nabs Corporate Partner From Paul Hastings in Palo Alto

By Rebecca Cohen |

Robert Carlson specializes in M&A work as well as matters involving private equity and private investment funds.

Meredith Beuchaw

Cooley Courts New York Tech Scene With Latest M&A Hire

By Meghan Tribe |

As the tech market continues to boom in New York, Cooley has added Greenberg Traurig M&A partner Meredith Beuchaw to its global mergers and acquisitions practice, the firm announced on Monday.

David Boies.

Boies Persuades Ninth Circuit to Revive Suit Over Nazi-Looted Art

By Ross Todd |

In the first art law case of his 50-plus year legal career, David Boies has helped convince an appellate court to revive a long-running lawsuit over a Nazi-looted painting by French impressionist Camille Pissarro

Mark Cohen, Founder & CEO of Legal Mosaic.

The Legal Industry Is Undergoing More Than a 'Dance Around Change'

By Mark A. Cohen |

Industry thought leader Mark Cohen responds to a recent piece in The American Lawyer on why there isn't more change to the business model of legal service delivery.

National Labor Relations Board in Washington, D.C.

Littler Mendelson's William Emanuel, Trump Pick for NLRB, Discloses Clients, Compensation

By Erin Mulvaney |

Littler Mendelson's William Emanuel, one of President Donald Trump's nominees to the National Labor Relations Board, identified 49 former clients in a financial disclosure and said he would recuse himself, for up to a year, if any of the companies appear before the agency. Emanuel and fellow NLRB nominee Marvin Kaplan are set for confirmation hearings Thursday.

Christopher Wray, of King & Spalding.

Trump's FBI Pick Christopher Wray Earned $9.2M Partnership Share at King & Spalding

By Katelyn Polantz and Mike Scarcella |

Christopher Wray, the King & Spalding white-collar partner who was nominated to replace fired FBI director James Comey, reported earning $9.2 million in his partnership share from 2016 and so far this year, according to financial documents made available Monday. Wray, a King & Spalding partner for nearly 12 years in the firm's Washington and Atlanta offices, also revealed numerous big-name clients in the required disclosure, released by the U.S. Office of Government Ethics. Wray is set to appear Wednesday for his confirmation hearing.

Jai Singh

Foley Lands Dentons Defector, Class Action Combination Veteran

By Rebecca Cohen |

Jaikaran "Jai" Singh, a former partner at Luce, Forward, Hamilton & Scripps and McKenna Long & Aldridge in San Diego, has become the latest alum of both firms to leave successor entity Dentons. Singh is now a member of the consumer law, finance and class action litigation group at Foley & Lardner.

With Infringement Complaints, Qualcomm GC Says It's Time for 'Affirmative Action' Against Apple

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

Don Rosenberg, general counsel of Qualcomm, spoke on why his company is striking back at Apple.

6 Ways California Can Entice Banks to Serve Marijuana Clients

By Cheryl Miller |

Two bankers suggest to the California treasurer's Cannabis Working Group six things the state can do to entice banks to accept marijuana businesses and ease concerns about federal regulators.

Twists and Turns of Copyright Litigation Over Jersey Boys Musical Reach Latest Stage

By Vincent Peppe |

Since 2007, the development of the musical has been the source of protracted litigation that reached its latest stage in June 2017.

Google offices in Mountain View.

US Appeals Court Set to Eye Test of Cy Pres Doctrine in $5.5M Google Accord

By Amanda Bronstad |

When class members are owed a few pennies from a settlement, how much should you bother trying to make sure they get paid? That's the question before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in a petition to reverse a $5.5 million settlement with Google Inc. over privacy claims that gives money to the plaintiffs' attorneys and six nonprofit organizations but nothing to the class. On Wednesday, attorneys general from 11 states filed an amicus brief insisting that the Delaware judge who approved the settlement didn't go far enough in attempting to put class members above the use of cy pres, a controversial practice used to distributed unclaimed funds in a settlement to third parties.

False Claims Case Against Gilead Revived

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A federal appeals court has reinstated a False Claims Act case alleging Gilead Sciences Inc. received billions in government reimbursements for HIV drugs that weren't qualified under the Food and Drug Administration.

Dolby Labs Hit With Sex Bias Suit by Ex-IP Staffer

By Ross Todd |

Dolby Laboratories Inc. was hit with a sex discrimination lawsuit Thursday by the company's former director of global compliance for intellectual property protection.

Legal Technology Companies Find a Voice in Amazon Alexa

By Rhys Dipshan |

A host of legal tech companies are integrating with Amazon's Alexa voice assistant, but can the technology and market catch up to the hype?

LOS ANGELES, SEP 10TH, 2016: Close up of the facade of the historic SAG-AFTRA plaza building on 5757 Wilshire Boulevard in the Miracle Mile district of Los Angeles, housing the Screen Actors Guild.

What's in the Actors' Deal

Bargaining teams from SAG-AFTRA and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers worked through the weekend—and several contract extensions—before reaching a deal Tuesday night. Here are some of the key points in the tentative agreement, which now goes to the membership for ratification.

Video Game Voice Actors Strike a Singular Exception to Hollywood Labor Peace

By Todd Cunningham |

There is labor peace in Hollywood now — with one notable and sticky exception. SAG-AFTRA negotiators reached a tentative deal for feature films and prime-time TV over the holiday with the major movie studios and networks. Pending the expected ratification, the agreement will cover the union's roughly 160,000 members and is in line with the pacts reached earlier by the directors and writers unions, each of which signed off on similar three-year deals which extend into 2020.

Kesha performs at the 9th annual Delete Blood Cancer Gala on April 16, 2015, in New York City.

O'Melveny Duo's Backup Work Key to Kesha's 'Praying' Release

By Todd Cunningham |

Embattled singer-songwriter Kesha released her first new single in four years Thursday. It's a defiant and celebratory tune called "Praying," and is accompanied by an artsy music video and will be on an album called "Rainbow," set for an Aug. 11 release. It took some standout backup work from attorneys Dan Petrocelli and Bo Pearl, partners at O'Melveny & Myers, to clear the way for the track's release. And it may do the same for the career of Kesha, who has sold more than 60 million records worldwide, but has been largely off the radar since an ongoing legal battle with her former producer Dr. Luke exploded in 2013.

Joshua Stein, Zenefits general counsel

Zenefits GC Joshua Stein On Outside Counsel, Moving Past Regulatory Challenges

By David Ruiz |

Joshua Stein spoke to The Recorder about the company's recent licensing issues, outside counsel relationships and more.

U.S. Congressman Xavier Becerra (D-CA), Attorney General nominee for the state of California. December 8, 2016.

Becerra, Arguing EPA Inadequacy, Dives Into Energy Case

By Cheryl Miller |

California and seven other states on Thursday moved to defend Obama-era ozone pollution standards that Attorney General Xavier Becerra said may be left to die under Scott Pruitt's leadership of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Uber headquarters in San Francisco

Policy Director Josh Gold Reflects on Uber's Big NY Win

By Josefa Velasquez |

Reporter Josefa Velasquez gets Uber policy director Josh Gold to sit down for a Q&A over the ride-hailing company's victory in a years-long battle to secure legislation allowing it to operate in upstate New York.

Denise Huskins, left, and her boyfriend Aaron Quinn listen as their attorneys speak at a news conference Monday, July 13, 2015, in Vallejo, Calif. The lawyers for the couple in a kidnap-for-ransom case that police called a hoax are blasting investigators and asking that authorities set the record straight. (Mike Jory/Vallejo Times-Herald via AP)

Vallejo Loses Bid to Avoid Defamation Suit by Home Invasion Victims

By Ross Todd |

A federal judge in Sacramento on Wednesday largely allowed the lawsuit to move forward in a case that mirrors plot elements from the movie "Gone Girl."

The VW logo of the brand

Lawyers in VW Diesel Emissions Case Seek Additional Fees

By Amanda Bronstad |

Lawyers who sued Volkswagen over its diesel emissions scandal could end up with a pretty good return on their investment: After being awarded $175 million in fees and costs, they are asking for an additional $125 million – and it appears there's a good chance they'll get it.

Twitter headquarters, located at 1355 Market St.

DOJ Can't Knock Out Twitter Transparency Lawsuit

By Ross Todd |

A federal judge in Oakland has turned back the Justice Department's request to end Twitter's lawsuit seeking to publish information about the number of requests it receives as part of national security investigations.

Carolyn Kubota

Covington's LA Office Makes Another Lateral Addition

By Rebecca Cohen |

Carolyn Kubota, a litigator and former member of the policy committee at O’Melveny & Myers, has joined Covington & Burling's new office in Los Angeles.

Charles Kagay, of California Appellate Law Group in San Francisco, CA.

Navigating the Post-Judgment Motion Maze

By Charles Kagay |

'Ryan v. Rosenfeld' illustrates that a good place to look for judicial mistakes is in California’s labyrinth of post-trial motions, which can be a source of vexation for trial practitioners.

SF Judges Are Asked for a Day's Pay to Reduce Budget

By Cheryl Miller |

The San Francisco Superior Court will furlough staff, cut clerk’s office hours and ask judges to donate one day of pay each month to help close a $5.3 million budget deficit.

Professor Mark Lemley, Stanford Law School

Newegg Overcomes Acacia in Attorney Fee Fight

By Scott Graham |

The Federal Circuit on Wednesday ordered Judge Rodney Gilstrap of the Eastern District of Texas to award attorney fees to Newegg, writing that deference to district court judges "is not absolute."

John Hern Jr.

Clark Hill Heads West After Absorbing 100-Lawyer California Firm

By Roy Strom |

The firm's proposed union with Morris Polich & Purdy will create a combined shop of nearly 450 lawyers in 16 offices stretching coast to coast. Clark Hill, which ranked No. 167 on The Am Law Second Hundred list, brought in $150.5 million in gross revenue last year.

U.S. Supreme Court

Justices' Broad View of 'Families' Is Tested in Trump Travel Ban

By Marcia Coyle |

The Trump administration may not view grandparents, aunts, uncles and others as having close enough family relationships in the United States to be excluded from the government’s travel ban, but the U.S. Supreme Court on at least two occasions, in different contexts, has recognized the importance of those family bonds.

In-House IP Counsel Doing More With Smaller Budgets, Report Says

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

Although intellectual property budgets continue to be squeezed, patent filings are on the rise, according to a new report from RWS inovia.

Uber self-driving car

Judge Turns Up the Heat on MoFo Over Files in Driverless Car Spat

By Ross Todd |

U.S. District Judge William Alsup is asking whether Uber's lawyers at MoFo have violated his orders that they hand over any Waymo files in their possession.

Julie Q. Brush, Solutus Legal Search .

How to Reject a Job Offer Like a Pro

By Julie Brush |

For those of you interested in taking your professional game to the next level, follow this nine-point roadmap for saying sayonara with style.

Randy Evans and Shari Klevens, Dentons partners.

Navigating Common Interest and Joint Defense Agreements

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |
Jeffrey Bleich

Why Dentons' Jeff Bleich Decided to 'Lace Up' for Lt. Gov. Run

By Cheryl Miller |

Dentons partner Jeffrey Bleich is criss-crossing California these days, introducing himself to voters who will decide next year whether he should be the state's next lieutenant governor. The Recorder recently caught up with the Democratic candidate before he took his campaign to Riverside and San Bernardino counties.

James Rodney Gilstrap, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee to be United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Texas. July 27, 2011. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL..

Texas Judge Sets Patent Venue Test for a Post-TC Heartland World

By Scott Graham |

U.S. District Judge Rodney Gilstrap would allow suits to stay in the Eastern District of Texas even if a defendant has no physical presence there.

Survey: Companies Not Prepared for Potential Trade Secret Theft

By Stephanie Forshee |

A new report from Baker McKenzie shows that plenty of companies don't have a plan in place to deal with trade secret theft.

New General Counsel Up to Bat for Baseball Players' Union

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

Ian Penny has been named general counsel of the Major League Baseball Players Association.

U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C.

11 Companies Flagged Over 'Made in USA' Claims So Far This Year

By C. Ryan Barber |

Through the first half of 2017, FTC staffers have sent 11 "closing letters" to companies the agency flagged for supposedly unsupported "Made in USA" claims. Among the highest-profile recipients was Target Corp., which put to bed FTC concerns by agreeing to pull mislabeled pillows from the shelves and to make clear that the Room Essentials-branded products were manufactured in China.

Seagate headquarters

Seagate Tech Hires Kate Schuelke as New CLO

By Kristen Rasmussen |

Seagate, a digital content storage company, has tapped Schuelke, most recently of Altera Corp.

Cyber Attack.

What In-House Lawyers Can Learn From the Cyberattack on DLA Piper

By Stephanie Forshee |

There are some takeaways for law departments from the recent mess at DLA Piper.

Uber sticker on a parked car on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

10 Uber In-House Attorneys Saw Due Diligence Report in Battle With Alphabet

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

A due diligence report at the center of Alphabet's battle with Uber over alleged stolen technology was seen by a number of Uber's in-house attorneys, according to a recent filing.

Bill Adams

Nossaman Nabs Three Ex-Michelman & Robinson Litigators

By Rebecca Cohen |

Williams Adams, a member of the management committee at Michelman & Robinson, managing partner of the firm’s San Francisco office and its local litigation head, is headed to Nossaman along with new partners David Lee and Ilse Scott.

A Denver Credit Union Won't Retreat in Marijuana Banking Fight

By Cheryl Miller |

Banks and credit unions in states such as California and Colorado, where marijuana is legal, are grappling with regulatory schemes over the processing of cannabis-related transactions. Three lawyers weigh in with takeaways about a recent federal appeals court ruling that addressed one Denver-based credit union's legal fight.

Uber Gets Red Light in Bid to Settle Drivers' Wage Claim

By Amanda Bronstad |

In its attempt to settle wage claims affecting more than 1 million of its drivers, Uber just slid off the road. At a hearing on Friday, a Los Angeles judge tentatively rejected a $7.75 million settlement that would have resolved claims that its drivers have been misclassified under California law as independent contractors, rather than employees. At a hearing on Friday, lawyers for both Uber and the plaintiffs in the case vehemently fought back against Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Maren Nelson's concerns that the deal might have been the result of collusion.

NFL Sacks Antitrust Class Action Over 'Sunday Ticket' TV Package

By Todd Cunningham |

A class action suit claiming that the NFL's exclusive DirecTV package violated antitrust law was sacked by a federal court judge Friday, who saw no evidence of conspiracy, collusion or significant harm to football fans or bars showing the games.

U.S. Supreme Court building

'A World Apart': Why SCOTUS Keeps Slamming the Federal Circuit

By Scott Graham |

In the just-ended term, the U.S. Supreme Court reversed the Federal Circuit six times, wiping away patent law precedents that stood for decades. Would more face time heal the schism?

Lateral Hazard: Legal Malpractice Claims Rise With New Hires

By Roy Strom |

Don't want to get sued for legal malpractice? Here's one over-lawyerly solution: Don't hire laterals. A survey of malpractice insurers states that conflicts of interest, often arising from lateral recruits, is the most common reason for malpractice suits.

DLA Piper Slowly Recovers After Ransomware Attack

By Katelyn Polantz |

After three days without phones and email following a cyberattack across Europe, DLA Piper's U.S. operation is back up and running. 

Google Loses Another Round in Fight Over Foreign-Stored Data

By Ben Hancock |

A Wisconsin federal magistrate judge has become the latest to rule that forcing Google to hand over email data stored overseas doesn't amount to an extraterritorial application of the law.

Sir Paul McCartney

McCartney's Deal With Sony to Regain Beatles Tunes Seen as Blow for Artists' Rights

By Todd Cunningham |

Paul McCartney has settled his legal battle with Sony/ATV over the rights to the songs he wrote while he was a member of the Beatles, and in the process struck a blow for artists' rights.

LinkedIn Spars With Data-Mining Company Over Access to Profiles

By Ross Todd |

Lawyers for social media site and data-mining startup hiQ Labs Inc. jousted in court Thursday afternoon in a case that likely will determine hiQ's fate.

GrubHub Faces Trial On Employee-Contractor Issue

By Ben Hancock |

A federal judge on Thursday indicated that she will allow a case against food delivery company GrubHub to go to a bench trial, in what could be a bellwether case for the gig economy.

Legal Departments Can Take the Lead When Workplace Disaster Hits

By David Ruiz |

When violence strikes the workplace, legal departments will have a big role in dealing with what comes next.

IRS to Scale Back Bitcoin Account Data Request

By Ross Todd |

A DOJ Tax Division lawyer said Thursday that the agency intends to narrow its request for information from San Francisco-based bitcoin exchange Coinbase Inc.

Computer Hacker.

DLA Piper Isn’t Alone—40 Percent of Law Firms Unaware of Breaches

By Ian Lopez |

A survey of 200 U.S. firms found that many law firms are unprepared for cyberattacks, and it’s hurting their standing with clients.

Phil Lord and Christopher Miller at the Los Angeles Premiere of

Disney's Director Change on Han Solo Creates a Disturbance in The Force

By Todd Cunningham |

Disney's upcoming "Star Wars" prequel about the young Han Solo is—by light years—the most potentially lucrative movie ever to switch directors in the middle of shooting. A Millennium Falcon-size headache would seem a real possibility for Michael Johnson and Sam Fischer of Ziffren Brittenham LLP, the legal team that would in theory rework the contracts of the exited directing duo Phil Lord and Chris Miller. Then there would be getting the new director, Oscar-winner Ron Howard, under contract and up and running, satisfying the Directors Guild of America and sorting out the credits issue; and keeping on track the most prestigious and lucrative properties owned by Lucasfilm and Disney.

Marketing 101—Or Why You Need a Marketing Mindset

By Meg Charendoff |

If I had a quarter for every time I've heard one of the following statements about marketing, I wouldn't exactly be rich, but I'd have a lot of quarters.

Small Drone Users Assess Appellate Court’s Decision to Bar FAA from Requiring Hobbyists to Register Drones

By Kristopher Kokotaylo |

On May 19, 2017, the D.C. Circuit struck down the FAA’s authority to issue registration requirements as to model aircraft. The Court’s ruling makes it unlikely that the FAA will attempt to further regulate hobbyist small UAS use absent new Congressional authority. However, hobbyist drone operators could ultimately face attempts by state or local agencies that seek to develop and administer new rules and regulations on model drone use.

Hollis Salzman of Robins Kaplan.

Robins Kaplan Adds Two Antitrust Experts in Silicon Valley

By Rebecca Cohen |

The firm has bolstered its office in Mountain View, California, by hiring a pair of antitrust and trade regulation experts in Aaron Sheanin and Tai Snow Milder.

04/06/15- 33200-33590 S. Dixie Highway, Florida City

Panda Express Settles DOJ's Immigration Claims

By Michael Booth |

Chinese restaurant chain Panda Express has agreed to pay the federal government a $400,000 fine and establish a $200,000 employee-compensation fund to settle claims it discriminated against non-U.S. citizens by violating law governing work visas.

AARP headquarters in Washington, D.C.

Hiring, Not Firing, Is a New Focus in Age Discrimination Suits

By Erin Mulvaney |

Management tactics that weed out older workers have pushed federal regulators and anti-discrimination groups to train an eye on hiring rather than firing when it comes to protecting against age bias, an effort advocates acknowledge is a steeper hill with increasingly narrowed protections for aging workers.

The Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.

After Years of Setbacks, Patent Owners Try to Turn Tide in Congress

By Scott Graham |

The STRONGER Patent Act of 2017, sponsored by Delaware Sen. Chris Coons, would undo recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings that have weakened patents. But lawmakers may have other priorities.

Young businessman sitting with legs crossed relaxing on the beach

Presenting the Summer Associate Morale-Booster Kit

By Leigh Jones |

No doubt many summer associates are thoroughly enjoying their jobs this season, but for those who feel anxious about their performance or worried about the impression they've made on hiring partners, here's some help.

screenshot of telepayusa.com

Phone Sex Workers Sue Over Low Wages, Long Hours

By Amanda Bronstad |

Phone sex might be expensive and short-lived for consumers, but it doesn't pay much for the workers on the other line. That's according to a class action filed on Tuesday alleging a California-based phone sex operator misclassifies its "phone actors" as independent contractors, depriving them of overtime pay and "off the clock" work.

Heather Burke

Greenspoon Marder's Cannabis Kick Continues With Burke Bolt-On

By Rebecca Cohen |

One of the most active firms in the legal marijuana space has been Greenspoon Marder, a Florida-based shop that has opened new offices across the country within the past year to cultivate clients in a growing field. Heather Burke, a California lawyer who has written for High Times, has become the latest to join the firm.

Left to right: Randy Evans and Shari Klevens, Dentons partners

Accurately Completing a Legal Malpractice Insurance Application

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |
Kent Goss

Orrick Litigation Duo Jumps to Crowell & Moring in LA

By Rebecca Cohen |

Crowell & Moring has hired Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe partners Kent Goss and Valerie Goo in Los Angeles, where they most recently served as head of the latter’s local litigation group.

European Union Commissioner for Competition Margrethe Vestager (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

The EU Just Fined Google $2.7 Billion. What Happens Next?

By Ben Hancock |

The decision by the European Commission will force the company to change the way it displays some search results, but also marks the opening of what is likely to be a long court battle and more civil litigation against the tech giant.

Lucy Koh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee during her confirmation hearing to become a judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. July 13, 2016. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/ALM.

Qualcomm Can't Shake FTC's Antitrust Suit, Judge Rules

By Scott Graham |

U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh will allow antitrust claims to proceed based on a theory that the chip giant abused its patent portfolio to extract inflated royalty rates. That's bad news for the wireless giant which is also fending off suits from Apple and consumers.

Judge Vince Chhabria, U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California

In IMDb Case, Judge Calls Out State for 'Abuse of Power'

By Ross Todd |

U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria wrote that the state's efforts to get information about IMDb's lobbying and amici campaigns were "harassing."

Uber

Uber Set to Argue for Accord in Drivers' Action, But Pushback Is Expected

By Amanda Bronstad |

On Friday, Uber Technologies Inc. plans to convince a Los Angeles judge to approve a proposed $7.75 million settlement that would resolve all claims brought over the alleged misclassification of its drivers under California's Private Attorneys General Act of 2004.

Ransomware Attack on DLA Piper Puts Law Firms, Clients on Red Alert

By Roy Strom |

The implications of network-crippling malware may be just as damaging for a deadline-driven service industry that holds the fate of companies’ legal issues in its palm.

U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C.

US Lawmakers Want Feds to Steer Driverless Car Rules

By Cheryl Miller |

Congressional Republicans and Democrats in Washington drew battle lines Tuesday over a package of self-driving vehicle bills that would pre-empt state-level regulations, including those in the final stages of development in California.

Elizabeth Rindskopf Parker

State Bar Lacks 'Effective Controls' on Spending, Audit Says

By Cheryl Miller |

Despite enduring a year of withering criticism from California lawmakers, the state bar still isn’t doing enough to track and rein in spending, according to a state audit released Tuesday.

Steptoe & Johnson offices in Washington, D.C. June 12, 2015. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Steptoe & Johnson Accused of Discriminating Against Female Lawyers

By Scott Flaherty |

Steptoe & Johnson became the latest major law firm to face accusations that it discriminates against women lawyers.

Supreme Court of the United States

SCOTUS To Weigh in On Where Securities Class Actions Belong

By Ben Hancock |

The court on Tuesday agreed to take up a case that could determine whether securities fraud class actions can move forward in state courts.

Objectors Slam No-Cash Settlement in Facebook Message-Scanning Suit

By Ross Todd |

Facebook reached a $3.8 million deal to settle a privacy class action earlier this year, all of which goes to attorneys for the plaintiffs.

Justice William Bedsworth, California Court of Appeals for the Fourth District

Bedsworth: The Almighty Comma

By William W. Bedsworth |

I love commas. My mantra is to give the reader as much guidance as possible, and commas are wonderful signposts.

Downtown Cityscape Los Angeles, California, USA

Foley & Lardner Lands Jones Day Partner in LA

By Rebecca Cohen |

Erik Swanholt, a litigator at Jones Day in Los Angeles for the past 16 years, has joined Foley & Lardner’s business litigation and dispute resolution group in the city.

Julie Q. Brush, Solutus Legal Search .

Ways to Explain Weird Moves, Short Stints on Your Resume

By Julie Brush |

A good resume tells a story: Your story. And that story must be cohesive, succinct and informative—leaving very little, if anything to call into question. While not every minute event should be detailed, it is vital to assess and include the most important sound bites ... Because one key omission or ad nauseam diatribe and your candidacy is DOA.

Anthony Kennedy.

SCOTUS Ends Term With Blow to Class Action Plaintiffs

By Tony Mauro |

In a 5-4 ruling delivered at its final sitting, the court strictly interpreted deadlines for opting out of ongoing securities litigation.

VGL Capital

Litigation Funder VGL Capital Bolsters Staff With Two Hires

By Roy Strom |

Barry Mandel, a retired partner at Foley & Lardner and former head of the firm’s securities enforcement and litigation practice, and Denis Salmon, a former co-chair of the intellectual property group at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, are making the move to a California-based litigation financier.

LOS ANGELES, SEP 10TH, 2016: Close up of the facade of the historic SAG-AFTRA plaza building on 5757 Wilshire Boulevard in the Miracle Mile district of Los Angeles, housing the Screen Actors Guild.

Five Ways the SAG-AFTRA Strike Strategy Differs From the Writers Guild's

By Todd Cunningham |

SAG-AFTRA's roughly 160,000 members have been asked to authorize their negotiators to call for a strike in an effort by the actors union to jump-start its stalled contract talks with Hollywood movie and television producers.

Dentons Washington, D.C. offices. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

3 Takeaways From Ex-Dentons Associate's Alleged Extortion Plot

By Scott Flaherty |

As many young lawyers settled in for a summer or their first year at a large law firm, global legal giant Dentons recently cut ties with one of its Los Angeles-based associates under unusual circumstances.

A large crowd rallies on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court, led by top Democrat lawmakers, to denounce President Donald Trump’s executive order banning immigration from 7 Muslim-majority countries, on January 30, 2017.

Supreme Court Narrows Travel-Ban Injunctions, Puts Case on October Calendar

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday partially allowed President Donald Trump's executive order suspending immigration from six Muslim-majority nations and the U.S. refugee program to take effect and agreed to hear arguments on the order’s legality in the fall.

MLB logo on glove

Minor Leaguers Strike Out in Antitrust Suit Against MLB

By Ross Todd |

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit sided with MLB and its lawyers at Keker, Van Nest & Peters on Monday, finding that Congress explicitly exempted minor league baseball from the federal antitrust law in the Curt Flood Act of 1998.

Legal Departments Keep Huge Percentage of Work In-House. Here's Why.

By Jennifer WIlliams-Alvarez |

Nearly 75 percent of work for legal departments is handled internally, according to a recent survey report from ALM Intelligence and Morrison & Foerster.

Judge William Orrick III, U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California

Anti-Abortion Activist Loses Bid to Boot Judge From Video Case

By Ross Todd |

Lawyers representing David Daleiden have lost out on their attempt to disqualify U.S. District Judge William Orrick III from handling a case where he has barred the release of hidden-camera videos recorded at two National Abortion Federation annual conferences.

Aaron Persky.

Critics Launch Effort To Recall Aaron Persky, Judge Who Sentenced Brock Turner To 6 Months

By Ben Hancock |

Santa Clara Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky ignited a nationwide uproar when he sentenced a Stanford athlete to six months in jail for sexually assaulting an unconscious woman.

John James Vlahos: January 4, 1936-February 9, 2017

In Memory of Longtime Partner, Hanson Bridgett Creates UC Hastings Scholarship

By James Vlahos |

John Vlahos joined the firm as its eighth employee in 1962. He died in February after a 10-month-long battle with lung cancer.

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.

Justices, Shying From Second Amendment, Won't Touch California's Gun Restrictions

By Marcia Coyle |

The U.S. Supreme Court, declining to step back into the contentious arena of gun regulation, refused on Monday to review the constitutionality of California's restrictions on the concealed and open carry of guns. Justice Clarence Thomas, with Neil Gorsuch, had urged the court to take up the challenge.

Palm Trees and Blue Sky

Two Golden State Boutiques Close Up Shop

By Rebecca Cohen |

Los Angeles-based Tropio & Morlan has disbanded, with the bulk of its lawyers joining Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker, while Beverly Hills-based entertainment law firm Freund & Brackey has broken up, with several of its lawyers landing at different locales.

Microsoft's data center in Dublin, Ireland.

Government Asks SCOTUS to Overturn Microsoft Decision on Overseas Data

By Ben Hancock |

The Department of Justice on Friday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a landmark appeals court decision handed down last summer in favor of Microsoft Corp. that put company data stored overseas mostly out of reach of U.S. law enforcement.

Travis Kalanick, former CEO and co-founder of Uber Technologies Inc.

Uber's Legal Department Drives Forward Without Travis

By David Ruiz |

Legal consultants and private-practice attorneys say Uber’s legal department needs to sort out a reporting structure and how to handle the Covington report without former CEO Travis Kalanick there to lead.

Cynthia Cole.

Cynthia Cole's Unexpected Path From GC to CEO at Spectra7

By David Ruiz |

After the sudden death of Spectra7’s CEO, then-GC Cynthia Cole stepped in to lead the company.

Fenwick & West at San Francisco's pride parade in 2016

From East to West, Big Law Comes Out for Pride

By Meghan Tribe |

On Sunday, June 25th, Pride Month celebrations will culminate with parades across the country, from New York to San Francisco. Lawyers and staffers from many law firms will be participating in the festivities.

Anthem Agrees to Record $115M Data Breach Settlement

By Ross Todd |

Plaintiffs attorneys are expected to net nearly 33 percent in fees, or almost $38 million.

Lawsuit Over Premise of 'Inside Out' Just the Latest Hit on a Disney Hit Movie

By Todd Cunningham |

Disney and Pixar were hit with a lawsuit filed in federal court Tuesday on behalf of Minnesota child development expert Denise Daniels, who claims studio executives used her original ideas to create the 2015 film, which was a critical, box office and awards hit.

Marijuana

How High Is Too High? Crunching Marijuana Taxes

By Cheryl Miller |

How high should marijuana tax rates be? That's a question more and more states are grappling with as they extend approval for medical marijuana use to adult recreational consumption. A consultant who worked on California's rate explains the "Goldilocks standard."

Op-Ed Response: In ‘the Most Important Lawsuit on the Planet,’ Who Exactly Should the Ninth Circuit Rein In?

By Douglas A. Kysar |

Thus far, the Juliana plaintiffs have survived the government's motions to dismiss and interlocutory appeal. At this point, the plaintiffs and the federal District Court judge, Ann Aiken in Oregon, stand ready to move the case to a prompt trial. The Department of Justice, on the other hand, has filed a mandamus petition, asking the Ninth Circuit to step in and short circuit ordinary procedures of discovery, trial and appeal.

Hanson Bridgett partner Lisa Pooley.

How to Comply With California's New Criminal History Regulations

By Lisa Pooley |

Recognizing that the consideration of criminal history in employment decisions is a frequently misunderstood and rapidly evolving area of law, the California Fair Employment and Housing Council (FEHC) issued new regulations, which are effective on July 1. The regulations largely mirror the guidance set forth by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in its April 2012 "Enforcement Guidance on the Consideration of Arrest and Conviction Records in Employment Decisions Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964."

Cooley Seeks Collaborative Inspiration With GitHub 'Series Seed' Documents

By Gabrielle Orum Hernández |

Firm hosts tech experiment that allows attorney-client collaboration

Hiring Misfires Show Need for Tougher Law Firm Vetting

By Scott Flaherty |

In less than a year, Big Law has seen at least three lateral hires go seriously, even criminally, awry.

Sleepless Nights for GCs Caused by Regulations and Crisis Management

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

A new report from ALM Intelligence and Morrison & Foerster shows just what is keeping GCs up at night.

Uber self-driving car

MoFo Withheld Stolen Waymo Files, Quinn Claims

By Ben Hancock |

Attorneys for Google's driverless car division say Morrison & Foerster lawyers had access to a portion of the stolen files at the center of a trade secrets lawsuit against Uber.

Kim Rivera, Hewlett Packard

HP General Counsel Offers Advice on Ensuring Gender Pay Equity

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

Kim Rivera spoke on the gender pay gap in the legal profession at an ACC Foundation event.

Kent Walker, Google general counsel

Google's Top Lawyer Says Digital-Evidence Law Needs 'Fundamental Realignment'

By C. Ryan Barber |

Since the dawn of the digital age, tech companies have grappled with the protection of privacy rights amid demands from foreign and domestic authorities seeking evidence for investigations. Those competing pressures have meant a tricky balancing act—but Google's top lawyer has some ideas for making it easier.

Justin Kan, heading the mystery Silicon Valley legal tech project Atrium

Atrium Courts VCs and Tech Leaders Who Could Eventually Become Customers

By Gabrielle Orum Hernández |

The company brought in $10 million in investments from 90 different sources.

Judge Says Uber Must Hand Over Driver Info to SF Tax Authorities

By Ross Todd |

Uber Technologies Inc. lost out in its bid to beat back a request for information about drivers who operate in San Francisco for more than seven days a year.

Mark Chandler, Senior Vice President and General Counsel of Cisco Systems, Inc.

How Cisco's IP Strategy to Stop Arista Went Bust

By Scott Graham |

Arista fended off copyright claims at trial in December and this week lawyers at Latham & Watkins helped the company avoid an ITC exclusion order. This can't be what Cisco GC Mark Chandler expected when he announced war two-and-a-half years ago.

In Fintech, Trade Secrets May Be Replacing Patent Applications

By Stephanie Forshee |

Fintechs may be relying more on trade secrets to control their IP than patent applications.

Lex Machina Announces Commercial Litigation as Next Rollout in Analytics Platform Expansion

By Ian Lopez |

The move is the latest in the company’s attempt to expand its analytics to all areas of federal practice.

SF-based Labor and Employment attorney SF-based Labor and Employment attorney Krista Johnson

Establishing a Culture of Workforce Compliance in Technology Companies

By Krista Stevenson Johnson |

In the current job market, many technology sector employers are seeking to recruit and retain top talent by creating a positive workplace culture. For many employers, this also includes efforts to recruit and hire workers from underrepresented groups such as women, African-Americans, and LGBTQ employees.

Microsoft Corporation Campus Sign .Redmond Washington.

Who's Afraid of EDTX? Not Microsoft

By Scott Graham |

Sidley Austin partner Michael Bettinger secured an against-the-odds defense win for Microsoft last week even after failing to wipe out the asserted videoconferencing patents before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board.

Denton partners Randy Evans and Shari Klevens

Unique Ethical Risks for Litigators

By Randy Evans and Shari Klevens |

As with other lawyers, litigators must comply with applicable ethics rules, professional standards of care and professional obligations. Indeed, the California Rules of Professional Conduct and the California Business and Professional Code apply to all attorneys practicing within the state. But the obligations for litigators in applying those rules, standards and obligations can differ from other practices. The following issues can present unique challenges for litigators that are not faced by their peers in the profession.

Leslie Caldwell.

Latham Makes Another Key Litigation Hire in Leslie Caldwell

By Rebecca Cohen |

Leslie Caldwell has become the latest former head of the U.S. Department of Justice's criminal division to join Latham & Watkins. The firm announced Wednesday that Caldwell will join its white-collar defense and investigations practice in September. The former partner at Morgan, Lewis & Bockius will work out of San Francisco.

Andrea Jeffries

Jones Day Welcomes Wilmer IP, Tech Partner in LA

By Rebecca Cohen |

Andrea Jeffries, a high-profile intellectual property and technology litigation partner at Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr in Los Angeles, is headed to Jones Day. Jeffries, who spent more than six years at Wilmer, is the latest lateral recruit by Jones Day this year.

As Litigators Depart, Sedgwick Sheds Staffers

By Roy Strom |

After watching a large group of lawyers decamp earlier this year, San Francisco-based Sedgwick has seen a spate of partner departures within the past month. Mintz Levin has landed two partners in Los Angeles, while Crowell & Moring and Troutman Sanders have made hires in other cities. As a result, Sedgwick has shed some staffers.

Qualcomm Headquarters in San Diego, CA.

Apple, Brandishing SCOTUS Decision, Accuses Qualcomm of ‘Double-Dipping’

By Scott Graham |

Things already looked bleak for Qualcomm as the FTC, Apple and consumers took aim with antitrust cases. Then the U.S. Supreme Court made it much, much worse.

Bristol-Myers Squibb

Access to Plaintiff-Friendly Jurisdictions Constrained in 'Game-Changing' SCOTUS Ruling

By Amanda Bronstad |

Monday's landmark decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in "Bristol-Myers Squibb v. Superior Court of California" has already had a massive impact. In mere hours, a judge in Missouri granted a motion for mistrial in a pivotal trial over Johnson & Johnson's baby powder due to the court's decision. Even plaintiffs lawyers concede that "Bristol-Myers" took a hatchet to a lucrative growth area in mass torts: Lawsuits brought on behalf of dozens of individuals in venues considered more favorable to plaintiffs.

Ninth Circuit Green-Lights Writer's Suit Over 'The Purge'

By Ross Todd |

The appellate court upheld a ruling finding that a writer could continue to pursue his claim that he was never paid for a script that allegedly spawned the action-horror franchise.

U.S. Labor Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.

Zenefits, Resolving Overtime Claims, Pays $3.4M to Misclassified Employees

By Cheryl Miller |

Human resources startup Zenefits will pay $3.4 million to 743 current and former employees the company misclassified as exempt from overtime and minimum wage rules, the U.S. Labor Department said Tuesday.

3 Ways Antitrust Law Could Collide With Big Data

By Ben Hancock |

Greater tech industry consolidation could lead to cases that test the bounds of traditional competition law.

Andrew R. Varcoe of Boyden Gray & Associates.

Op-Ed: Will the Ninth Circuit Rein in What Might Be 'the Most Important Lawsuit on the Planet'?

By Andrew R. Varcoe |

Does the U.S. Constitution guarantee a right to be secure against climate change? And do the President and his officers have a legal duty—enforceable by a federal district judge—to pursue and implement an effective strategy to fight climate change? These, to say the least, are cutting-edge questions. And the Ninth Circuit—which remains one of the most important environmental-law courts in the country—may be deciding them very soon.

San Francisco skyline with Golden Gate Bridge

Silicon Savings: BayLegal and One Legal Announce Legal Aid Partnership

By Rhys Dipshan |

Legal tech provider One Legal's partnership with Bay Area Legal Aid includes a revenue-sharing program and the ongoing donation of legal technology and services.

Julie Q. Brush, Solutus Legal Search .

So You Say You're OK Accepting a Lower Level Role: Prove It

By Julie Brush |

Titles can be tricky things--sometimes they mean a lot, other times they mean close to nothing. But titles can play a key role when it comes to a job search, influencing interviews, compensation and the overall viability of a candidacy.

Elizabeth Cabraser, Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein

Cabraser to Head Fiat Chrysler 'Clean Diesel' MDL

By Ross Todd |

Elizabeth Cabraser will reprise her role leading an emissions-related MDL—to the chagrin of at least one of her co-counsel.

Uber headquarters in San Francisco

Making GC Head of Human Resources Could Have Helped Uber, Attorneys Say

By David Ruiz |

In the Covington & Burling report released last week by Uber Technologies Inc. in response to claims of harassment and bias at the company, one theme kept popping up: gaps in the human resources department’s communication with in-house counsel.

Assemblymember Ed Chau, D-Monterey Park.

Calif. Pushes Internet Privacy Rules That Trump Repealed

By Cheryl Miller |

California on Monday joined more than a dozen other states that have introduced internet privacy legislation after Republicans in Washington and the Trump administration repealed Obama-era rules limiting what AT&T, Comcast and other broadband providers can disclose about their customers' online habits.

YouTube

9th Circuit 'Dancing Baby' Decision Will Stand

By Scott Graham |

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to take up a case that challenged the bar for YouTube and other platforms to remove allegedly infringing content under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

The Slants

Supreme Court Rules First Amendment Protects Disparaging Trademarks

By Tony Mauro |

A high-profile trademark fight centered on the Asian-American rock band The Slants ended Monday with a ruling that the Lanham Act’s prohibition against “disparaging” marks violates the First Amendment.

U.S. Supreme Court building.

SCOTUS Narrows Forum-Shopping in Big Pharma Action

By Tony Mauro |

In a win for the corporate defense bar, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday tightened jurisdictional rules that determine where companies can be sued.

Lyft

Lyft, Uber Tell Agency to Stop Thinking About Driver Fingerprints

By Cheryl Miller |

Lawyers for ride-hailing companies Lyft Inc. and Uber Technologies Inc. subsidiary Rasier-CA are urging a state agency not to adopt a driver-fingerprint requirement because the California Legislature has not mandated the practice.

A Customs and Border Protection officer watches travelers at Miami International Airport.

Feds' MDL Bid May Further Delay Info on Travel Ban Detentions

By Amanda Bronstad |

The ACLU's legal efforts in obtaining records of everyone detained or removed under President Donald Trump's executive orders on immigration might have to wait a bit longer after the U.S. Department of Justice moved last month to coordinate the organization's 13 lawsuits into multidistrict litigation.

Orrick in San Francisco

Orrick Ushers in New Parental Leave Policy

By Rebecca Cohen |

Just in time for Father's Day, Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe is expanding the relatively generous parental leave policy the firm introduced two years ago.

Christine Coats

Oracle's Legal Ops Chief Offers Tips on Spend Management

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

Christine Coats of Oracle spoke to Corporate Counsel about how to cut legal spend.

Call for Nominations: The Recorder's Litigation Departments of the Year 2017

The Recorder is seeking nominations for its 2017 Litigation Department of the Year awards.

Call for Nominations: The Recorder's Corporate Departments of the Year 2017

The Recorder seeks nominations for Corporate Department of the Year, which will go to the firm whose corporate practice outperformed peers based on the size, scope and success of deals handled in the last half of 2016 and first half of 2017.

Snap Gets Shuttered in Domain Name Dispute

By Scott Graham |

A World Intellectual Property Association arbitration panel ruled that "geofilters" is a descriptive term for software.

Glassdoor Resists Feds' Bid to Unmask Reviewers

By Ben Hancock |

Glassdoor Inc., the operator of the anonymous online job review site, has asked the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit to block an attempt by federal prosecutors to unmask reviewers as part of a grand jury investigation.

Genesis Healthcare’s Willow Creek facility in Clovis, California.

Genesis Healthcare to Pay $53M to Settle DOJ False Claims Act Suits

By Ross Todd |

Officials at the Department of Justice announced the settlement with the Kennett Square, Pennsylvania-based nursing home and rehabilitation therapy company Friday morning.

Handicapping Site to Pony Up $500,000 to Pay Horse Racing Tracks

By Todd Cunningham |

The Stronach Group, operators of horse race tracks across the nation, has cashed in its winning ticket in a settlement and is set to receive $500,000 over the next year from the owners of Derby Wars, a handicapping contest website it sued in 2015.

Matthew Zinn.

Jaunt VR Snags TiVo's Former Top Lawyer

By Stephanie Forshee |

Virtual reality media company Jaunt Inc. has picked up Matthew Zinn.

Downtown Cityscape Los Angeles, California, USA

Primer on Industry Contingent Compensation Provisions

By BY MICHAEL I. RUDELL AND NEIL J. ROSINI, Law Journal Newsletters |

Much can be learned about the entertainment industry by comparing how those who perform services or license rights in their works are compensated under agreements to which they are a party. Some compensation in those agreements is fixed and essentially guaranteed, such as advances and flat fees. Other types, which are the subjects of this article, are contingent.

Greg Chin

Mintz Levin Brings on Ex-Latham, Jones Day Partner

By Rebecca Cohen |

Greg Chin, a former co-head of the cleantech practice at Latham & Watkins and a one-time partner at Jones Day, has left San Francisco’s Flatiron Law Group to join Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo in the Bay Area.